3

Is there an elegant way to adjust the position of an exponent for a particular parameter ? For instance, in this image, we can see that the exponent is too close from the main letter R and the indexes {E-G}

enter image description here

I am simply using the basic syntax : R_{E-G}^{2}

Is there an alternative for this use case ?

Thank you in advance for your help,

Sincerely.

0

2 Answers 2

5

I don't think you should try to “fix” it.

If “E-G” are “indexes” (indices), shouldn't they be typeset in upright type with a hyphen rather than a minus sign?

Here are a few ways to interpret the issue. Take your pick.

Note. fleqn and leqno are used just to get a smaller picture with numbers for reference. See the comments in the code to see what each line accomplishes.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage[fleqn,leqno]{amsmath}

\begin{document}

\begin{gather}
% no fix
\frac{\rho g H^4}{R_{E-G}^{2}}
\\
% no cramped style
\frac{\rho g H^4}{\textstyle R_{E-G}^{2}}
\\
% move the subscript down
\frac{\rho g H^4}{R_{E-G}^{\vphantom{y}2}}
\\
% move the superscript right
\frac{\rho g H^4}{R_{E-G}^{\,2}}
\\
% both movements
\frac{\rho g H^4}{R_{E-G}^{\,\vphantom{y}2}}
\\
% textual subscript
\frac{\rho g H^4}{R_{\textup{E-G}}^{2}}
\\
% textual subscript moved down
\frac{\rho g H^4}{R_{\textup{E-G}}^{\vphantom{y}2}}
\end{gather}

\end{document}

enter image description here

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  • 1
    thank you for the variety of propositions provided : I found that the last one was much closer to what I expected. Indeed, it's better to use \textup for this kind of configurations. Thank you.
    – Waxler
    Commented May 12 at 13:40
6

You can use \mskip or \mkern to move the exponent right and use \raise to move the exponent up a little.

\documentclass{article}

\begin{document}

\[\frac{\rho gH^4}{R_{E-G}^2} \quad
  \frac{\rho gH^4}{R_{E-G}^{\,\raise1pt\hbox{$\scriptstyle 2$}}}\]

\end{document}

By The TeXbook, \, is an abbreviation for \mskip\thinmuskip and \thinmuskip = 3mu.

enter image description here

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