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I would like to place two page-width figures on top of each other in a two-column document: Fig.1 on the top of the page and Fig.2 just below it. These are separate figures, with own numbers and labels.

If I don't specify any options, i.e. leave [ ] empty, the 2nd figure is placed at the top of the following page, and if I add [h] it is placed at the end of the document.

In the document I am using the nidanfloat package to force a table at the bottom of the 1st page of the document (the figures are on later pages).

\documentclass[9pt, a4paper, twocolumn]{extarticle}
....
\usepackage{nidanfloat} 
...

\begin{figure*}[t]
\includegraphics{F1.png}
\caption{F1 cap}
\end{figure*}
\begin{figure*}[h]
\includegraphics{F2.png}
\caption{F2 cap}
\end{figure*}
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  • Please make your code compilable (if possible), or at least complete it with \documentclass{...}, the required \usepackage's, \begin{document}, and \end{document}. That may seem tedious to you, but think of the extra work it represents for the users willing to give you a hand. Help them help you: remove that one hurdle between you and a solution to your problem. Commented Jun 21 at 11:12
  • two column floats don't have h so [h] will aways force floats to the end as it prvents t or p being used so the float has no legal placement. Commented Jun 21 at 11:52
  • If I don't specify any options, i.e. leave [ ] empty, No!!! not having an option means omitting the square brackets (this is what you should do) specifying [] is using the option but explictly specifying an empty list of allowed placements Commented Jun 21 at 11:54

1 Answer 1

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You can have multiple \includegraphics and multible \captions inside one \begin{figure}...\end{figure}, so just by commenting out the two lines

\end{figure*}
\begin{figure*}[h]

you should achieve your goal. You may want to insert some \vspace{xxx} to your taste. This is in fact one of the most common "latex tricks" that I have been able to teach beginners.

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  • I would throw in a \vskip\floatsep for normal spacing. If they fill the whole page, use [p]. Commented Jun 21 at 14:28

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