27

I'd like to use a rotated version of $\ltimes$ where the vertical line is at the top, and another where the vertical line is at the bottom. I tried using \rotatebox with graphicx, but it puts the symbol either too high or too low. Any thoughts?

35

You can rotate with respect to the center of the glyph:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{amssymb}
\usepackage{graphicx}

\newcommand{\btimes}{\mathbin{\rotatebox[origin=c]{90}{$\ltimes$}}}
\newcommand{\utimes}{\mathbin{\rotatebox[origin=c]{-90}{$\ltimes$}}}

\begin{document}
$A\btimes B\ltimes C\utimes D$
\end{document}

enter image description here

If you need the symbols also in subscripts or superscripts, then load also amsmath and do

\newcommand{\btimes}{\mathbin{\text{\rotatebox[origin=c]{90}{$\ltimes$}}}}
\newcommand{\utimes}{\mathbin{\text{\rotatebox[origin=c]{-90}{$\ltimes$}}}}
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  • I'm having a problem with \mathbin in sub/superscripts. For example, $A_\btimes B^\ltimes$ won't work without extra {...} brackets. – Māris Ozols Dec 4 '13 at 18:23
  • 1
    @MārisOzols You have to use B^{\ltimes}; there's nothing to do about that. – egreg Dec 4 '13 at 18:28
  • 1
    @Andrew Adding the extra braces hides \mathbin, making it useless: if used between symbols it won't behave like a binary operation symbol. – egreg Apr 22 '14 at 22:05
4

according to

 texdoc symbols

table 50 the mnsymbol package has \utimes and \dtimes

table 51 the mathdesign package has \utimes and \dtimes

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