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In the german Koma Script Book I read about the elegant way to predefine the personal address in a .lco file like this

~/texmf/tex/latex/jd_private_v001.lco # <- added answer here for other readers

\ProvidesFile{JohnDoePrivate.lco}[2012/04/11]
\setkomavar{fromname}{John Doe}
\setkomavar{signature}{John Doe}
\setkomavar{fromaddress}{Iceroad 4\\ Northpole}
...

And include it in the header of a letter like

~/my/work/letters/letter.tex

\documentclass[foldmarks=true,foldmarks=blmtP,%
JohnDoePrivate,version=last]{scrlttr2}
\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}

\begin{document}
\opening{Dear Peter,}

I just want to say "hi".

\closing{Best wishes}
\end{letter}
\end{document}

My first idea was to create one .lco per sender address like JohnDoePrivate.lco, JohnDoeWork.lco and store them global on my Linux system. But where?

If John moves I could create a jd_private_v002.lco and LaTeX will hopefully take the latest address. I could also use the old .tex files too, if I force LaTeX to use a special version.

1
  • 3
    Probably in ~/texmf/tex/latex/scrlettraddresses
    – egreg
    Commented Nov 6, 2012 at 23:18

1 Answer 1

7

Depends to your system: Linux or Windows.

However, it is the same as creating an own package and saving it in the local TEXMF tree which can be for Linux

~/texmf/[TDS]
/usr/local/texmf/[TDS]
/usr/local/texlive/texmf-local/[TDS]

and so on. For MiKTeX you can define own trees and add them to the root base.

And in all directories you have to create a TDS (TeX Directory Structure), as Enrico already pointed out.

4
  • sorry, but usr/local/ is not system wide.
    – user2478
    Commented Nov 7, 2012 at 14:41
  • @Herbert /usr/local is of course system wide, in the sense that any user can access it.
    – egreg
    Commented Nov 7, 2012 at 18:33
  • no, only local user in the subnet.
    – user2478
    Commented Nov 7, 2012 at 21:18
  • 2
    I placed the template to ~/texmf/tex/latex/JohnDoePrivate2.lco and it works. I did not place it to /usr/... because I think private addresses should be saved in private directories. Commented Nov 9, 2012 at 16:29

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