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I have created epigraph in my book using the latex command \epigraph. I would use \textit style but I got an epigraph that not follow the margin. when I use \textit it became squeezer

This is what I mean:

enter image description here

I would that epigraph should be big as the line

2 Answers 2

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You didn't provide a working example, but from your picture I'll hazard the guess that you're using Palatino or a similar font. Palatino's italic variant is narrower than the Roman one, and an epigraph that with the latter font seems to be justified reveals with the former font that it is, in fact, typeset raggedright. Solution: Redefine \textflush to flushepinormal (without preceding backslash, as it is an environment).

\documentclass[11pt]{article}

\usepackage{mathpazo}

\usepackage{epigraph}
\renewcommand{\textflush}{flushepinormal}

\usepackage{lipsum}

\begin{document}

\epigraph{\textit{None is so great that he needs no help, and none is so small
    that he cannot give it}}{King Solomon}

\lipsum[1]

\end{document}

enter image description here

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    Yo! +1 for having a working crystal ball Commented Nov 23, 2012 at 14:54
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Please always provide a working example showing which packages are used (\epigraph is not a standard LaTeX command). However I would guess that you want

\epigraph{\itshape....}
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  • No it doesn't work. I loaded a pic that show you the problem
    – Mazzy
    Commented Nov 23, 2012 at 11:10
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    You need to give us some clues to allow us to help. Please post a complete small document using the minimum number of packages that shows that effect. Presumably it is unrelated to the italic font and the epigraph is that wide whichever font you use? Commented Nov 23, 2012 at 11:29
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    In this specific case, it is related to switching to italic -- seee my answer.
    – lockstep
    Commented Nov 23, 2012 at 14:29

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