21

Well, may be this is not really useful, but I've thought if it was possible to put all the document in one long page.

I mean, if your document is going to be read in a computer, mix all the pages in a continuous page.

If your document has 90 pages (A4), where each one is 21cm by 29.7cm the continuous document should be (more or less) one page which is 21cm by 90 · 29.7 = 2673cm.

Is this possible?

EDIT: Some things I would like to achieve:

  • The \newpage, \chapter{}, \part{}, etc. shouldn't go to a new page, they should only add more vertical space.
  • The package pdfpages should add the pages continuously with almost no space between them.
  • The titlepage, in this case, has a different color, so it could go alone in a basic A4 page (just to make things easier).

Question

Is this possible?

23

2673cm is 26.73m. The TeXBook says

danger TeX will not deal with dimensions whose absolute value is 2^{30} sp or more. In other words, the maximum legal dimension is slightly less than 16384pt. This is a distance of about 18.892 feet (5.7583 meters), so it won't cramp your style.

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  • So the answer is no? If it is no, you can close this question. – Manuel Dec 22 '12 at 15:18
  • 3
    I don't think the question need be closed, it is a valid question and if it is left open it is easier for other people to find it. You just have to accept the answer is no:-) – David Carlisle Dec 22 '12 at 16:25
2

This previous answer is not exactly true. You can create a \vbox with arbirtary size, so you can (for example) do

\setbo0=\vbox{... whole document ...} 

The problem is, what to do with it. You can do \shipout\box0 to print it, but the PDF page dimensions are not properly set because we need to set such page dimensions by TeX dimen registers and the mentioned limit about 5.7 meters is here. But if an interpreter of your document can handle with page dimensios a it is able to change them, then you have whole document in one column with 26 meters hight. Maybe, you have a special device which is able to print it.

If you use dvi output then \shiput\box0 (from previous example) cerates correct output because dvi format does not care about page dimensions. These dimensions are set by the dvi driver. Maybe, you have a dvi driver which is able to print your document on skyscrapers. And if not, you can create such dvi driver.

Another possibility is to create normal (small) document but to use a \mag TeX primitive register. It puts to the output the scaling factor of whole document as a message for PDF interpreters or dvi drivers. So, you can prepare a small document, test it on your personal printer and then you can put \mag with big scaling factor. You can print the same document on airships.

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