53

I'm not aware of a way to do this with nomencl. However, there are other packages which can be used. I'll give two examples, one for my package acro and one for glossaries. acro The acro package allows to assign acronyms to a class and print lists for each class (also for combined classes...). This fact can be used for the task. Entries are defined with ...


41

I want to have a glossary where I explain some terms or where I give a one sentence explanation and refer to the section where the term is discussed in detail. With the glossaries package, each term is first defined (in the preamble if you don't want nasty surprises that can occur in certain circumstances) using \newglossaryentry. For example: \...


38

I believe the acronym package option you're looking for is nolist, e.g., \usepackage[nolist,nohyperlinks]{acronym} The package options aren't clearly listed in the CTAN documentation, but they're discernible from the implementation section. They are: footnote The option footnote makes the full name appear as a footnote. nohyperlinks If hyperref is ...


29

To define plural exceptions, you can use \acrodefplural: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{acronym} \acrodefplural{OS}[OS's]{Operating Systems} \begin{document} \acp{OS} \begin{acronym} \acro{OS}{Operating System} \end{acronym} \end{document} More information can be found on Section 2.3.1 Non standard and foreign plural forms of the acronym package ...


29

Here is an example using the previously defined \tooltip command. Some user macros from the Acro package needed to be redefined to insert the tooltips only after first use: For Acronyms in black and non-draggable tip boxes use \def\ac#1{\acifused{#1}{\tooltip**[black]{\acs{#1}}{\acl{#1}}}{\acorig{#1}}\relax} \def\acp#1{\acifused{#1}{\tooltip**[black]{\acsp{...


28

A while back I created a package and some BibTeX styles for automatic journal abbreviations that uses the ISSN database to do exactly this: http://www.compholio.com/latex/jabbrv/


28

Your problem is not caused by IEEEabrv.bib, which simply contains the abbreviated names of IEEE journals; it is rather caused by the style IEEEtran.bst, which is programmed to abbreviate author names. According to this, maybe you could write your author as author = {{\relax World Health Organization} and others}


27

acronym provides \acresetall for resetting the behaviour. After using it each acronym will behave as if it is called for the first time. So just call \acresetall at the beginning of a chapter (or section). In order to automate this you can load the etoolbox package and place \preto\chapter\acresetall in your preamble (or \preto\section\acresetall if you ...


23

I recommend using glossaries or acronym (with a preference for the former). For limited use one can also define them directly: \newcommand{\newacronym}[3]{\newcommand#1{#3 (#2)\gdef#1{#2}}} Thus \newacronym{\TWWBA}{TWWBA}{That Which Will Be Abbreviated} will allow to write \TWBBA and get That Which Will Be Abbreviated (TWWBA) the first time and ...


22

EDIT: There is an elegant way now with biber 0.9.6. Together with biblatex 1.7. the data can be changed on the fly without changing the input .bib file itself. It utilizes the map feature of biber as described in section 3.1.1 of the manual. The biber.conf file looks like this: <map> <bibtex> BMAP_OVERWRITE 1 <globalfield journal> ...


18

You have to tell acronym both spellings: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{acronym} \usepackage{etoolbox} \makeatletter \newif\if@in@acrolist \AtBeginEnvironment{acronym}{\@in@acrolisttrue} \newrobustcmd{\LU}[2]{\if@in@acrolist#1\else#2\fi} \newcommand{\ACF}[1]{{\@in@acrolisttrue\acf{#1}}} \makeatother \begin{document} \begin{acronym} \acro{SRS}{\LU{S}{...


17

\documentclass{article} \usepackage{glossaries} \newacronym{twwba}{TWWBA}{That Which Will Be Abbreviated} \begin{document} text \gls{twwba} more text \gls{twwba} \end{document}


17

biblatex-apa already has this feature - you just need to use the shortauthor field in your bib file. Note that corporate names need to be wrapped in braces so that they don't get parsed into elements of a person's name. \documentclass{article} \usepackage[ngerman]{babel} \usepackage{csquotes} \usepackage[style=apa,sortcites,backend=biber]{biblatex} \...


17

Here's an idea using expl3: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage{expl3,xparse} % turn expl3 space on: `:' and `_' are letters now and spaces % are ignored. To insert a space use `~'. \ExplSyntaxOn % declare a new sequence variable: \seq_new:N \l_pouya_boldfirst_seq % the internal command: \cs_new:Npn \pouya_boldfirst:n #1 { %...


17

Make your own "abbreviations" environment. For example \documentclass{article} \newcommand{\abbrlabel}[1]{\makebox[3cm][l]{\textbf{#1}\ \dotfill}} \newenvironment{abbreviations}{\begin{list}{}{\renewcommand{\makelabel}{\abbrlabel}}}{\end{list}} \begin{document} \begin{abbreviations} \item[US] United States \item[EU] European Union \item[Gvmt] Government \...


16

You can achieve this by passing the name of your longest acronym as an optional parameter to the acronym environment. In your case it would lead to the following code: \documentclass[a4paper,12pt]{article} \usepackage{hyperref} \usepackage{acronym} \begin{document} \section*{Acronyms} \begin{acronym}[AWGN] \acro{MRC}{Maximal Ratio Combining} \acro{QoS }{...


15

Phil Ratcliffe has recently posted to CTAN two packages to deal with this question: xpunctuate “provides the commands \xperiod, \xcomma and \xperiodcomma, which follow a similar procedure to that of \xspace, and insert punctuation if and only if it is necessary,” and foreign which, among other things, uses the commands from xpunctuate to define \eg and \ie ...


15

This seems to be a good application of the RegEx features of LaTeX3: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{xparse,l3regex} \ExplSyntaxOn \NewDocumentCommand{\BoldFirst}{ m } { \pouya_boldfirst:n { #1 } } \cs_new_protected:Npn \pouya_boldfirst:n #1 { \tl_set:Nn \l_pouya_input_tl { #1 } \regex_replace_once:nnN { \A(.*?[A-Za-z]) } { \c{textbf}\cB\{ \1 \...


15

Just as cgnieder has said, you have to use the nopostdot option. Example: \usepackage[nopostdot,nonumberlist,acronym,toc,section]{glossaries}


15

Without luatex you can do this, although the space around the word doesn't stretch with other inter-word space on the line. \documentclass{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \setlength\textwidth{5cm} \def\etc.{\discretionary{}{etcétera}{\hbox{ etc.}}} \begin{document} abc\etc. abc\etc. abc\etc. abc\etc. abc\etc. abc\etc. abc\...


15

In chapter 4 of the user manual the two options are plural and firstplural. The change is simply: \newacronym[plural=cM,firstplural=centiMorgans (cM)]{cM}{cM}{centiMorgan} and the mwe with this change is: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[colorlinks]{hyperref} \usepackage[acronym]{glossaries} \makeglossaries \newacronym[plural=cM,firstplural=...


14

You should be aware that the abbreviation is not arbitrary, because there is the standard ISO 4 that defines a List of Title Word Abbreviations (LTWA). As far as I know, every abbreviation is unique, so that abbreviating/un-abbreviating should work unambigously in both directions. The CAS has a small online tool CASSI that can be used to search for journal ...


14

I recommend the glossaries package. It provides several predefined styles and can be customized very well. Strengths of glossaries are: The very good documentation: besides a normal user's manual it offers a beginner's guide and an upgrade guide (from the predecessor glossary), and even an author's FAQ, plus well documented source code It comes with a Perl ...


14

Package acronym uses \AC@hyperlink for its links. This can be redefined to locally set option hidelinks: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{acronym} \usepackage{hyperref}[2011/02/05] \makeatletter \AtBeginDocument{% \renewcommand*{\AC@hyperlink}[2]{% \begingroup \hypersetup{hidelinks}% \hyperlink{#1}{#2}% \endgroup }% } \...


13

This is handled nicely by the acronym package. I recommend it. EDIT As mentioned by egreg in the comment below, the glossaries package is particularly useful for this too.


13

Completely different way than in my previous answer, is reading the package documentation, for example here. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{acronym} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \begin{document} \begin{acronym} \acro{FoobAR(tm)}[FoobAR™]{Copyrighted} \end{acronym} \begin{acronym} \acro{MM}[M\&M]{I ...


13

I’d recommend taking a look at the glossaries package. When defining an acronym you have six user-defined keys at your disposal which you can use for storing any additional information. Minimal example: %% Document generation: %% $ pdflatex example && makeglossaries example && pdflatex example \documentclass[naustrian]{article} \usepackage{...


13

Consider the following plain TeX file. \tracingonline2 \showboxbreadth20 \setbox0\hbox{CATAPULT}\showbox0 \setbox0\hbox{C.A.T.A.P.U.L.T.}\showbox0 \bye It produces the following log > \box0= \hbox(6.83331+0.0)x54.72229 .\tenrm C .\tenrm A .\kern-0.83334 .\tenrm T .\kern-0.83334 .\tenrm A .\tenrm P .\tenrm U .\tenrm L .\kern-0.83334 .\tenrm T ! OK. ...


13

There are a few different fields you can use: shorthand: Replaces the entire citation label. In verbose/"notes" styles, this abbreviation is used after the first citation. shorttitle: Replaces title if it appears in the citation label. In verbose/"notes" styles, this abbreviation is used after the first citation. shortjournal: Defined in the default data ...


13

Don't use capitals in this case. Quoting Hedrick, Fine Points of Typographic Usage: What do you do if a sentence starts with an acronym, e.g. "RUCS is great." If you're using small caps, I would set RUCS in small caps. Some people are bothered because this seems to violate the rule about capitalizing the first word. To understand my answer, you ...


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