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5

You can use \substack and \textstyle\uparrow. I suggest using a local macro in order to ease input. The \hidewidth bits are to avoid the negative numbers taking up space. \documentclass[12pt, a4paper]{book} \usepackage{amsmath,bm} \begin{document} \textbf{Step 1:}\quad Weight the given binary number. \[ \newcommand{\wt}[2]{% \underset{\substack{\...


3

A solution with TikZ, just for the sake of completeness \documentclass{standalone} \usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{matrix,positioning,arrows} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture} \matrix(mybinary)[matrix of math nodes, nodes in empty cells, row sep=1em,column sep=.5em]{% 1 & 0 & 1 & 1 & 0 & 1 & \textbf{.} & 1 & 0 & 1 ...


3

Some suggestions: Omit all \bigg sizing directives and omit the associated opening and closing parentheses. Break the left-hand parts of the three long equations into three rather just two parts and use \qquad and \quad directives to "shove" the first and second lines to the left and create a slightly staggered look. Use \tfrac{1}{2} rather than ...


3

If you want to add vertical rules in a tabular constructed with the tools of booktabs (which is not the spirit of booktabs), you may use nicematrix. In {NiceTabular} of nicematrix, there is a key vlines which draws all the vertical rules (in a way compatible with booktabs). More broadly, we can draw whatever rule you want with Tikz by using the PGF/Tikz ...


2

The environment {array} adds a length equal of \arraycolsep on both sides of the array. In the documentation of amsmath, you read: The extra space of \arraycolsep that array adds on each side is a waste so we remove it [in {matrix}] (perhaps we should instead remove it from array in general, but that’s a harder task). In order to delete those spaces, you ...


2

Using the amsmath package you can try something like this: \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{tabular}{ccccccccccc} $\underset{5}{\stackrel{1}{\uparrow}}$ & $\underset{4}{\stackrel{0}{\uparrow}}$ & $\underset{3}{\stackrel{1}{\uparrow}}$ & $\underset{2}{\stackrel{1}{\uparrow}}$ & $\underset{1}{\stackrel{0}{\uparrow}}$ & $\underset{0}{\...


1

A solution with alignat* and eqparbox: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{newpxtext} \usepackage{newpxmath} \usepackage{mathtools} \usepackage{stmaryrd} \usepackage{eqparbox} \newcommand{\eqmathbox}[2][M]{\eqmakebox[#1]{$\displaystyle#2$}} \makeatletter \newcommand{\xmapsfrom}[2][]{% \ext@arrow3095\leftarrowfill@{#1}{#2}\mapsfromchar } \makeatother \...


1

You could use a single array environment and place the long arrows the three central columns using in \multicolumn. \documentclass[11pt]{article} \usepackage{newpxtext} \usepackage{newpxmath} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{mathtools} \usepackage{stmaryrd} \makeatletter \newcommand{\xmapsfrom}[2][]{% \ext@arrow3095\leftarrowfill@{#1}{#2}\...


1

How do you like \documentclass{book} \begin{document} \[ \begin{array}{ccccccccccc} 1 & 0 & 1 & 1 & 0 & 1 & \textbf{.} & 1 & 0 & 1 & 1 \\ \uparrow &\uparrow &\uparrow &\uparrow &\uparrow &\uparrow && \uparrow &\uparrow &\uparrow &\uparrow \\ 5 & 4 & 3 &...


1

Don't play with arraystretch to vertically centre the contents of cells: it increases asymetrically the spaces at the top and at the bottom of cells. Use cellspace instead, which enables you to define minimal vertical spacings at the top and bottom of cells in columns with specifier prefixed with the letter S (or C if you load siunitx). Unrelated: needless ...


1

You can use align and alignedat, which works in both worlds. \begin{align*} \max &\; x_{1}+x_{2}+x_{3} \\ \text{subject to} &\; \begin{alignedat}[t]{3} x_{1} & -{} & 2x_{2} & +{} & x_{3} & \leq 4 \\ & & x_{2} & +{} & 12x_{3} & \leq -15 \\ -3x_{1} & & & -{} &...


1

As suggested by @Bernard in the comments, you could use the cases environment from amsmath. Alternatively, you could reduce the spacing between the brace and the equations by placing @{} before the l column specified in the array. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath,amssymb} \begin{document} Original: \( \left\lbrace \begin{array}{l} x^2 + y^2 = R \\...


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