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12

In comments it is stated that you are using mathptmx this is an old package targetting the fonts available in early PostScript laser printers. It has no support for bold math. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{mathptmx} \begin{document} $\alpha$ \boldmath $\alpha$ \end{document} produces the warning Package mathptmx Warning: There are no bold math ...


11

\setmainfont is not a command meant only for xelatex. It is a command from fontspec for both engines. babel has its own command to set fonts (which also can be used with both engines). In your case the optional argument [italian] disables the small caps because of two reasons: At first with the optional argument babel doesn't directly load the font but only ...


10

A good idea would be to use enumitem and to define a special environment for “theorem enumerations”, so as to ensure consistency across the document. documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsthm} \usepackage{enumitem} \newenvironment{thmenum} {\begin{enumerate}[label=\upshape\bfseries(\roman*)]} {\end{enumerate}} \newtheorem{proposition}{Proposition} \...


9

You can reproduce exactly the same issue with the following minimal example. \documentclass{article} \begin{document} \fontfamily{times}\selectfont \textbf{bold} \textit{italic} \end{document} Upon running LaTeX on it, you'll be greeted with some warnings: LaTeX Font Warning: Font shape `OT1/times/m/n' undefined (Font) using `OT1/cmr/m/n' ...


8

latex math alphabets (unlike math symbol fonts) are assigned on demand as they are used. This means that you can declare any number of math alphabets but you may only use a total of 16 math fonts (math symbol fonts and math alphabets). This 16 is a hard limit of the TeX program. Apart from test documents that are trying to use every possible font in a single ...


7

Although this does not directly answer your question, I suggest the following redesign based on siunitx for the units and the alignment of numbers within a column and booktabs for horizontal lines with improved spacing: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{geometry} \usepackage{booktabs} \usepackage{siunitx} \begin{document} { \centering \begin{tabular}{@{}...


7

Just list all the fonts. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \setmainfont{Alegreya}[ Extension=.otf, UprightFont=*-Regular, UprightFeatures={SmallCapsFont=*SC-Regular}, ItalicFont=*-Italic, ItalicFeatures={SmallCapsFont=*SC-Italic}, BoldFont=*-Bold, BoldFeatures={SmallCapsFont=*SC-Bold}, BoldItalicFont=*-BoldItalic, ...


7

You’re correct: \mathbf does not change the weight of symbols other than latters and numbers. The correct way to get a bold comma (or plus sign, etc.) is to set a bold math version. As of 2021, there is no sans-serif math font that comes in a bold version, but you can fake one with fontspec commands. Unfortunately, the range= and version= options of \...


6

Use \DeclareFontSeriesDefault to redeclare the fontseries. I'm doing it in the document only to show the difference. utf8 is the default since more than 2 years, so I removed inputenc: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage{lmodern} \begin{document} abcd \textbf{ABCd} \DeclareFontSeriesDefault[rm]{bf}{b} abcd \textbf{ABCd} \end{...


5

A good choice is to use the physics package, which provides the \vb*{} command to do what you are looking for, as well as other commands to display vectors: Code: \vb{v} \quad \vb*{v} \quad \va{v} \quad \va*{v} (with \usepackage{physics})


4

Without a MWE, we can’t reproduce this problem. However, you say that you’re using the font tgschola. This does not support Cyrillic, so if you check the log, you’re probably getting a message similar to: LaTeX Font Warning: Font shape `T2A/qcs/b/n' undefined (Font) using `T2A/qcs/m/n' instead on input line 23. This tells you that no T2A ...


4

The following workaround suggested by Ulrike Fischer here worked for me. Adding the line \DeclareFontShape{OT1}{cmss}{b}{n}{<->ssub * cmss/bx/n}{} at the beginning of the document yields the desired behaviour. Crucially, this fix causes no harm when used with older installations of TeX Live, which means I can work on the same file across different ...


4

Adding font=\bfseries in the enumerate environment gives what you want. Here is your corrected code \documentclass[12 pt, a4paper]{book} \usepackage{multicol} \usepackage{geometry} \geometry{a4paper, total={170 mm,257 mm}, left=20 mm, top=20 mm, } \usepackage{amsmath,bm} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \...


4

Here are two possible solutions using a regular tabular in combination with the boldline package or using a tikz matrix: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{boldline} \begin{document} \begin{tabular}{|c|c|c|} \hline & x & \\ \hline \clineB{2-2}{2} x & \multicolumn{1}{V{2}c|}{x} & x \\ \hline &...


4

You can use p instead of m in your column definitions and that will give you what you expect. (p will align on the first line, m will align centered and b will align on the bottoms).


4

This is a start. Make sure you read this and this plus a general introduction in LaTeX, see here and here. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{bm} \begin{document} Text $\boldsymbol{a^\pm + b ^\mp}$ Text. \end{document} PS: Unrelated, but maybe consider not to use math in headings and titles. Maybe you can describe it verbally as in &...


4

The newer version of ieeeaccess.cls does a very bad set of definitions. Let's see what happens. The class is based on IEEEtran.cls that enables the old font commands such as \bf. Such (silly) idea allows users to do something like ${\bf x}$, which has been deprecated for more than 25 years. So the developer of ieeeaccess.cls decided that this is not good, ...


3

I guess you are looking for something like this: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} \[ \begin{split} \mathbf{W} &= \text{the player with the white dice wins the game,} \\ % Line 1 \mathbf{B}_{i} &= \text{the red die shows $i$, where $i = 1,\dotsc,6$.} % Line 2 \end{split} \] \end{document} I use an unnumbered ...


3

The \text... commands by design pick up the surrounding text font settings. This is rarely what you want in normal mathematics, although it can be useful if using fractions and similar constructs with natural language numerator and denominator. If you use \math... commands then the math alphabets keep a fixed style in all text contexts, so \documentclass{...


3

Use the LaTeX bm package via rcParams You can tell Matplotlib to use LaTeX, and aside from some aesthetic settings (well worth having a look through) you can tell it to do do some stuff with LaTeX, such give it a small preamble, where among other things you can import packages. For bold maths the best package is the bm package (as far as I am aware). Hence a ...


3

I've modified your code slightly, and the modified MWE is: \documentclass[12 pt, a4paper]{book} \usepackage{multicol} \usepackage{geometry} %\geometry{a4paper,total={170mm,257mm}left=20mm,top=20mm} \usepackage{amsmath,bm} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{soul} \usepackage{indentfirst} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage{palatino} \...


3

Stix itself does not seem to have bold Greek in text mode (although there are bold Greek math symbols). You can use a substitute font instead. A good option might be Tempora, which is explicitly designed as a "companion to Times font packages" for Greek and Cyrillic, i.e., it is a font that matches Times (and therefore Stix). It also fully supports ...


3

In unicode-math, you can declare a bold math version and use \boldsymbol. XITS Math comes with one, and \setmathfont{XITS Math} will load it automatically for \boldsymbol, \boldmath and \mathversion{bold}. You could also embolden a math font with FakeBold, as in: \usepackage{unicode-math} \setmainfont{TeX Gyre Termes} \setmathfont{TeX Gyre Termes Math} \...


2

You’re loading polyglossia, which loads fontspec, and using an OpenType font. This is not compatible with the legacy package bm. One solution is: \usepackage{unicode-math} \defaultfontfeatures{ Ligatures=TeX, Scale=MatchLowercase } \setmathfont{TeX Gyre Termes Math} % Or another math font \setmathfont{Georgia}[range=up] \setmathfont{Georgia Italic}[range=it]...


2

Use the ItalicFont= and BoldFont= options, such as \setmainfont{MinionPro}[ UprightFont = *-regular , BoldFont = *-semibold , ItalicFont = *-it , Extension = .otf ] Add BoldItalicFont = if you have one, enable any other features you want to use, and tweak to match your filenames.


2

A variant with array and boldline: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{array} \usepackage{boldline} \begin{document} \begin{tabular}{|>{\rule[-1mm]{0pt}{9mm}}m{5mm}|*{2}{>{\centering\arraybackslash}m{5mm}|}} \hline & & \\ \hline\clineB{2-2}{3} & \multicolumn{1}{c V{3}}{A} & X \\ \hline & X & \\ \hline \multicolumn{3}{&...


2

Use the semantic-markup package! It defines \strong, \quoted, \term, and other commands of this type.


2

The \text{} command inherits the formatting of the surrounding text. If you’re in a sans-serif bold header, the sans-serif bold will bleed through. If you’re in an italicized theorem statement, the italics will bleed through. You can also use \textrm, \textup, \textbf and so on. These will set only one font axis (family, shape, weight) and leave the others ...


2

This is a proof of concept: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath,bm} %\usepackage{xparse} % not needed for LaTeX 2020-10-01 or later \ExplSyntaxOn \cs_new_protected:Nn \vigolo_embolden_command:N { \cs_set_eq:cN { __vigolo_ \cs_to_str:N #1 : } #1 \cs_set_protected:Npn #1 { \bm { \use:c { __vigolo_ \cs_to_str:N #1 : } } } } \cs_new_protected:Nn ...


2

Using my answer on one of your previous question: \documentclass[oneside,11pt]{book} \usepackage[semibold,tt=false]{libertine} % <--- \usepackage{libertinust1math} % <--- \usepackage{booktabs} \usepackage{siunitx} \usepackage{etoolbox} \newrobustcmd\B{\DeclareFontSeriesDefault[rm]{bf}{b}\bfseries} \newcommand\mcc[1]{\multicolumn{1}{c}{#1}}...


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