14

Here is a solution using tikz. The main feature, I think, is that the pin labels are easy to edit/change. This is possibly fortunate because the labels below are roughly the same as the OPs for pins 1-16 but the remaining labels need to be changed as they just repeat the labels for the first 16 pins. Here is an image for what my code produces: and here is ...


12

Although the answer by Zarko is correct, the problem in your code (apart a bit of strange path building) is this line: \node (G1) at ([shift=({-1.3cm,0cm})]comp.-) {}; and you can see it if you substitute your code with: \node [draw=red](G1) at ([shift=({-1.3cm,0cm})]comp.-) {}; which gives: Nodes have a minimum size, and when they are connected the ...


11

Sorry. I went lost in your code, so I write new one, which reproduce desired result. I preserve coordinate (C) regardless that it is not needed for drawing this picture. \documentclass[margin=3mm]{standalone} \usepackage[siunitx,RPvoltages]{circuitikz} %Circuit Schematics/Diagram \usetikzlibrary{arrows,shapes,calc,positioning} \begin{document} \begin{...


9

Inspired by the code given by @qubyte HERE and after adding some new quantum logic gates and patience, drawing the plot is possible. Information: more inform Code \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture}[thick] % `operator' will only be used by Hadamard (H) gates here. % `operator2' is for large U gates % `phase' is used for controlled phase gates (dots). ...


9

This is one way of doing it via circuitiz package. Two customized circuit elements are designed via macros called mycurrent and myswitch, hoping this will serve as a starting point. Code \documentclass[border=10pt]{standalone} \usepackage{tikz} \usepackage[american,siunitx]{circuitikz} \usetikzlibrary{calc,positioning} \newcommand{\mycurrent}[2] % #1 = ...


9

Just for fun an option creating customized components, in the basic way with scope; using circuitikz support shapes to declare some points (N3);(N2);(N6);(N6-OUT), to draw pasive components, then create a line style using markings to draw reference voltages, because the given by circuitikz looks bad (the minus simbol is shorten than the positive, and the ...


8

You can specify the desired symbol via the options: Code: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[american]{circuitikz} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture} \draw (0,0) to[cute inductor] (3,0) ; \node [below=5pt] at (1.5,0) {cute inductor}; \draw (4,0) to[american inductor] (7,0) ; \node [below=5pt] at (5.5,0) {american inductor}; \end{...


8

You can use the "border pin" anchors (I have enlarged a bit the pads to fit the numbers). \documentclass{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[siunitx, RPvoltages]{circuitikzgit} \begin{document} \begin{circuitikz} \ctikzset{multipoles/thickness=4} \ctikzset{multipoles/thickness=4} \ctikzset{multipoles/external pins thickness=2} ...


7

An imperfect starting point without schemabloc... \documentclass[tikz,border=5]{standalone} \usetikzlibrary{positioning,arrows.meta,calc} \tikzset{ block/.style={ shape=rectangle, fill=white, draw=black, minimum width=1.25cm, minimum height=0.75cm, label=above:\strut#1 }, sum/.style args={+ #1 - #2}{ shape=circle, fill=...


7

Update Now there's control over the filling and the drawing colors: \documentclass[dvipsnames,x11names,svgnames]{article} \usepackage{pgfplots} \usetikzlibrary{arrows, circuits.ee.IEC, positioning} \usepackage[american voltages, american currents,siunitx]{circuitikz} \usetikzlibrary{backgrounds} \colorlet{vsourceAMcolorfill}{cyan!50} \colorlet{...


7

You can invert the voltage source by changing the counting direction of the voltage using v<=$V$ Your full example will look like: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{graphicx} \usepackage[american]{circuitikz} \begin{document} \begin{figure} \centering \begin{circuitikz} \draw (0,0) to[V,v<=$V$] (0,3) ...


7

Really there is no such a symbol in circuitikz --- you can make a request on the issue tracker but it will be after 1.0, I suspect. The nice thing is that you can quite build it with the new muxdemux shape (version 1.0.0-pre2 or better): \documentclass[border=10pt]{standalone} \usepackage[siunitx, RPvoltages]{circuitikz} \begin{document} \begin{...


6

Here is a Circuitiz component version for a general 64 Lead Quad Flat Package. (My OCD seems to be acting up.) Of course, I usually stick components into a separate file where I never have to look at the code again. \documentclass{standalone} \usepackage{circuitikz} \newlength{\ResUp} \newlength{\ResDown} \newlength{\ResLeft} \newlength{\ResRight} % ****...


6

The following should get you started. Edit: you can control the opacity of draw and fill elements independently, using the draw opacity and fill opacity keys, respectively. See Tikz: use opacity for fill, yet leave draw (lines) untouched for more details. \documentclass{standalone} \usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{decorations.markings,arrows,patterns,...


6

Here's how I would do it. Instead of manually adjusting the position of the labels, use the anchors of the transistors and position the label nodes left or right of these. to paths leading nowhere (++(0,0)) can be used to add filled or open marks at the transistor anchors. I also avoided manually positioning the transistor "C" by using the calc library to ...


6

Currently the current arrow color is set to the same color as everything else. But one can always redefine and add things. \documentclass{standalone} \usepackage{circuitikz} \makeatletter \ctikzset{current arrow color/.initial=black}% create key \pgfdeclareshape{currarrow}{ \anchor{center}{ \pgfpointorigin } \anchor{tip}{ \...


6

You can use the tikzlibrary positioning to have the syntax [left=n of N] where n is the node distance and N is the node that should be positioned relative to. use the calc library as shown below. use relative coordinates to draw the edge in two steps. \documentclass[]{article} \usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{shapes,arrows} \usetikzlibrary{...


6

I don't really use this library but here is a definition based on the existing Zener diode shape. I made up the distances so bettercheck the standards. And the gate anchor is missing. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{circuits.ee.IEC} \tikzset{ thrystor IEC graphic/.style={ diode IEC graphic, /pgf/generic diode IEC/before ...


6

I made a few changes to make it look more like the original, and to commit fully to relative coordinates. Note that to centers the components between the end points, so to offset the component you need move the end points. To add text you use normal TikZ nodes (circuitikz is a tikzpicture). Since they don't have to be perfectly aligned one has some ...


6

The sine functions on your oscilloscope is drawn by the lines: \draw[trace] plot(\x,{1+2.4*sin((2.5*\x +1) r)}); % r for radians... \draw[trace] plot(\x,{-1+1.25*sin((0.75*\x) r}); You can change the functions to a square wave function, by replacing the above lines with \draw[trace] (-5,2) -- (-3.14,2) -- (-3.14,-2) -- (0,-2) -- (0,2) -- (3.14,2) -- (3....


6

Here's an option used styles and relative positioning \documentclass[tikz, border = 5pt]{standalone} \usetikzlibrary{arrows, positioning, decorations.markings, calc} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture}[ node distance = 1cm and 2cm, ] \tikzstyle{block} = [ draw, minimum width = 2cm, minimum height = 1cm, inner sep = 2pt, outer ...


6

It is possible using TiKz library tikz-relay (https://ctan.org/pkg/tikz-relay): \documentclass[margin=3mm]{standalone} \usepackage{circuitikz,tikz} \usetikzlibrary{circuits.ee.IEC.relay} \begin{document} \begin{circuitikz}[circuit ee IEC relay,thick] \draw (0,0) to [relay coil={info=$K_1$,term=A1,term'=A2}] (0,1); \end{circuitikz} \end{document}


6

In circuitikz I would build something like this (hey, I have a repeated $R_4$, easy to fix!): \documentclass[border=10pt]{standalone} % need 0.9.0+ \usepackage[siunitx, RPvoltages]{circuitikz} \begin{document} \begin{circuitikz}[ ] \draw (0,0) coordinate(start) to [short, i=$i$] ++(1,0) coordinate(a) -- ++(0,1) to [R=$R_1$] ++(3,0) --++(0,-1) ...


6

With pst-circ, you simply have to define a series of empty nodes corresponding to the input and output of each dipole component, then insert the dipoles and close the connections with 4 \ncangles commands: \documentclass{standalone} \usepackage{pst-circ,pst-arrow, auto-pst-pdf} \begin{document} \begin{pspicture}(-1.5,-1)(11,6) % DC ...


6

The most likely problem here is that you have different versions of circuitikz in the two installations. To check this put somewhere in your source document the command \pgfcircversion: Circuitikz version here is \pgfcircversion{} released on \pgfcircversiondate{}. and you'll obtain, for example (my personal installation): or, on Overleaf today (January ...


6

This question is a bit a kind of "do-it-for-me"; it would be much better if you tried something and then posted an example showing where you got problems. You can do it both with the internal TikZ circuit library and with circuitikz. Both have manuals that I think are quite readable, especially the first one ;-). Just to help you start, this is the start ...


5

If you want easy: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{circuits.logic.US,calc} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture}[circuit logic US] \draw (0,0) node[xor gate](XOR1){} ($(XOR1.north west)!.5!(XOR1.input 1)$) -- ++(-.5,0) (XOR1.input 1) -- ++(-.5,0) (XOR1.west) -- ++(-.5,0) (XOR1.input 2) -- ++(-.5,0) ($(XOR1.south west)!.5!...


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