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1

With the help of the valign option (introduced by the adjustbox package) and the \captionof command from the caption package: %% document class \documentclass[t]{beamer} \mode<presentation>{ \usetheme{Dresden} \setbeamercovered{transparent} } \mode<handout>{ % tema simples para ser impresso \usepackage[bar]{beamerthemetree} % Colocando um fundo ...


1

Actually, the source of both problems is vwcol. On the first page of the documentation, the author states: “Due to difficulties with the processing of such a thing, little else besides text is allowed within (feel free to experiment, but you’re on your own).” In order to get text into unequal columns, the text has to be manipulated several times -- each time ...


1

Maybe an automatic header would be more practical? \documentclass[10pt]{article} \usepackage{lipsum} \usepackage{vwcol} \usepackage{geometry} % to change the page dimensions \geometry{a4paper} % or letterpaper (US) or a5paper or.... \geometry{margin=1.0in} \usepackage{fontspec} \setmainfont{Verdana} \newcommand{\makeheader}[3]{% \...


1

To have a complete picture of the possibilities, I include a table typeset with the help of cals. It is very easy to have such alignments using a calstable. I have removed left and right side bearing, which add code, not strictly necessary for creating OP’s table: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{cals, caption, amsmath} \usepackage{lmodern} \begin{...


6

This is rather hard: the problem is that you want to align the middle box in two ways: on the left along the baseline, on the right along the center. This type of table normally requires either nesting of tables (which is difficult with tabularx) or measuring some of the content to use \llap tricks. We are missing here tabular code based on xcoffins which ...


6

Like this: Edit: Position of columns contents are determined by row baseline, which (unfortunately) cannot be changed from column to column. So far I don't see any other possibility than to use boxes either in the last or the first column, which align their baseline. A good candidate for your particular case is \adjustbox: \documentclass{article} \...


6

Here a solution based on the redefinition of the X column type, and two possible hacks for the first column (they may have to be adapted to the real contents): \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{tabularx, booktabs, makecell} \renewcommand{\tabularxcolumn}[1]{m{#1}} \begin{document} \begin{table}[htb] \centering \begin{...


3

At a standard line width, the table is slightly overfull, so I use a tabular* trick; you'll need to check whether this works and the intercolumn space is adequate, otherwise you may resort to \small. The second column is not S, but you should use \num for its entries. Set properly the number of digits for the other columns. Please, don't use math mode for ...


2

It makes no real sense to use a S column specifier for the size column. However, use the notation {...} if you have not a number in the column cell and, of course, use proper specifications for numbers: 3.1 (iii.d) reserves space for three integers and one decimal \documentclass[a4paper, 12pt]{article} \usepackage{amsmath,siunitx,booktabs} \begin{document} ...


1

Ok, here's a solution that uses \dotfill while avoiding the problem of creating an unsightly gap in some of the rows of dots. The solution lies in converting the entire tabular structure to having a single column and replacing all 17 instances of \dotfill&\dotfill to just \dotfill. In the following code, I've employed a tabularx environment and set its ...


1

Speaking for myself, I find the layout shown in your screenshot hard to take seriously. This is irrespective of whether or not there's a slight gap between the dots of the two columns. For me, the proliferation of dots comes perilously close to shouting out loud, "Look, Ma, I've figured out how to typeset lots of dots in a row!" Your mother may well be ...


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