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Easier to show than explain. The calc tikzlibrary can locate fractional distance between two points. The following locates (0.5,0.3) relative to the (img) node. \documentclass{standalone} \usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{calc} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture} \node[inner sep=0] (img) {\includegraphics{example-image}}; \coordinate (A) at ($(img.west)!...


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The package xcoffins was created to put stuff (text, figures, tikz pictures, ...) into boxes and attach them using their relative positions, emulating a graphic layout program. The work flow has four steps: (1) Allocate the boxes (\New) (2) Fill the boxes with the material (\Set). (3) Join the boxes (\Join) using some of the predefined points (corners, ...


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As @AndrewStacey wrote, you can very well define nodes with the coordinate shape in the middle of a path. Otherwise, just make sure the nodes have minimum size=0pt, inner sep=0pt, outer sep=0pt if you want “connecting lines” to reach their center. The code below illustrates this for nodes A and Q of your example. I changed the two corresponding \fill ...


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As already mentioned by @SebGlav, it seems that you are looking for a combination of two commands clip (which defines which part of the image is visible) and shift (which changes the origin). To simplify this double command, you can define a new clip and shift style that does the job. \documentclass[tikz,border=7pt]{standalone} \tikzset{ % usage in scope ...


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Maybe you would find use as bounding box syntax interesting. And then use a scope with shifting the coordinate system. \documentclass[border=3.14mm,tikz]{standalone} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture} \begin{scope} \clip (6,2) rectangle (9,5); \node[anchor=south west,inner sep=0] at (0,0) {\includegraphics[width=0....


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