12

I have been thinking about this question for weeks now, and finally I think I came really close to a result you may also like. I have even tried to use Processing to solve this problem, which resulted in a nice animation as a byproduct, but it didn't lead me closer to the solution. But back to the point… Unfortunately the solution I'm ...


9

I'm afraid there's little to do. The package pgf-pie is very badly written. While in a user document one can choose to use \i inside a \foreach cycle, this should not be inflicted to the users of a package, which should be as neutral as possible. Ask the developers to change the local variables in their \foreach cycles. In the meantime, add \let\tikzi=\i ...


8

Use pmboxdraw and the literate key for listings. In the documentation for pmboxdraw there is the full list with the LICR names. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{listings,pmboxdraw} \lstset{ basicstyle=\ttfamily, columns=fullflexible, keepspaces, literate= {┐}{\textSFiii}1% {└}{\textSFii}1% {┴}{\textSFvii}1% {┬}{\textSFvi}1% {├}{\...


8

You are looking for METAFONT, a program also written by Knuth and accompagnying TeX. This program has a close relative METAPOST that can be used for drawing PostScript or SVG figures. Start here: http://tug.org/metapost.html I like the tutorial by André Heck, it will give you a feeling of the program.


7

To add a space manually, use p\aa\ folks or p\aa{} folks To do it automatically, have a look at the package xspace and its command \xspace. You could even patch \aa with it: \usepackage{xspace} \usepackage{etoolbox} \apptocmd{\aa}{\xspace}{}{}


7

Unless you really have to use polyglossia, you can try the following, which seems to work fine on my machine: \documentclass{scrartcl} \usepackage[ngerman]{babel} \usepackage[utopia]{mathdesign} \usepackage{fontspec} \setmainfont{Utopia} \begin{document} The german ß compiles to ß when used with \emph{mathdesign} package. \begin{equation} a^2 = b^2 + c^2 \...


6

Those symbols are in IPA: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{tipa} \begin{document} \textsubbridge{t}\quad \textyogh\quad \textesh\quad \textdyoghlig\quad \textteshlig \end{document} For the last one you might prefer \texttoptiebar{t\textesh} The characters are available in some OpenType fonts, for example FreeSerif. Compile the following with ...


6

Your á is not a single glyph but an a with a combining accent U+0301. With the proper glyph U+00E1 is works fine: \documentclass{article} \begin{document} \catcode`\á =\active \def á {Yawn, I'm tired}% á \end{document}


6

The Calluna font misses U+0301 (COMBINING ACUTE ACCENT), so your input that uses it will not produce the accent. On the other hand the precomposed glyphs for á and ú exist, but not ḿ (U+1E3F LATIN SMALL LETTER M WITH ACUTE). There's no “t with acute” in Unicode, so you can't get it either. However, you can use lower level TeX features, in this case \accent: ...


6

I've just created a new package that adds support for the Unicode collation algorithm for LuaTeX - Lua-UCA. I've already added support for few languages, like Czech, German or Norwegian. We can use it instead of Xindex built in sorting mechanism. Try the following version of xindex-norsk.lua: -----------------------------------------------------------------...


5

You can randomize letters in ConTeXt easily with MetaFun \startMPpage picture p; p := outlinetext("mathematics") ; for r = 0 upto 10 : for i within p : draw i randomized (r*.1pt) shifted (0,-r*10pt) ; endfor ; endfor ; \stopMPpage You should also try out randomizedcontrols in place of randomized for a different effect.


5

It seems a bug somewhere. A temporary workaround: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} %\setmainfont{Linux Libertine O} \newcommand{\hdigit}[1]{% \accent\string"02C6 #1% } \begin{document} \^5 causes a collision! And 5^^^^0302 too. But \hdigit{5} doesn't. \end{document}


5

If the file name is stored in a macro, you can exploit \detokenize: \newcommand{\fileName}{}% just to see it can be used \edef\fileName{\detokenize{./CaMKII-8+PP1-32+L-125e-9+N-5+di‌​ff-0.1e-12.dat_proce‌​ssed.csv}} This will have no consequence when \fileName is used for reading a file. Note that you need \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} for the underscore to ...


5

Generally non-ascii letters are not allowed in math mode, there are various methods to allow them, but generally non-english letters are only used in two cases within math As a part of an index. Here it is recommended to use _{\textup{sø}} or _{\textnormal{sø}} as this switches back to the (upright) text font where non-english letters are allowed The other ...


4

The position of the diacritics can be adjusted using stackinset from the stackengine package. The idea is to define a separate macro for every combination of letter and diacritic. This defeats the purpose of using unicode, but the result is as required. The arguments of \stackinset are horizontal align of the inserted symbol relative to the base symbol (...


4

You can use following definition: \catcode`\"=13 \def"{\begingroup\og \def"{\fg\endgroup}} Aha "test" more "once".


4

You need a different structure to handle UTF-8 with pdftex (but see below for different solution): \documentclass[10pt,a4paper,openany]{book} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage[romanian]{babel} %\usepackage{eg} %this is the definition for the font I use %\pdfmapfile{+eg.map} \newcommand\chara{a} \makeatletter \def\...


4

I assume that your K7 encoding contains characters that are not available in T1. There are various stages for this. I'll describe what happens for T1. Step 1 We have a Type1 font that contains many more than 256 glyphs. In order to access them, we need an encoding vector, a file such as cm-super-t1.enc which contains % LIGKERN hyphen hyphen =: endash ; ...


4

I suggest you add the instructions \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} to your preamble. The following example had to modify the color coding choices since you didn't provide information about how the various java... colors are defined. \documentclass{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} % assumes input is utf8-encoded \usepackage[T1]{...


4

If you can use LuaLaTeX instead of either pdfLaTeX or XeLaTeX, it's possible to set up a Lua function as well as TeX macros and environments -- named \kt and ktenv in the example code below -- that perform an automated conversion of c, C, l, and L to ȼ, Ȼ, ⱡ, and Ⱡ, respectively. % !TEX TS-program = lualatex \documentclass{article} \usepackage{luacode} \...


4

From the comments and this question on stackoverflow, a solution is to use \verb, for example this way : \verb!^\s*HELO\s+(\S+)\s*$!


4

With the current xindex (version 0.23) and xindex -u -l no -c norsk <file> you'll get Inserted by Sveinung 4.6.2020 Sorting order table for Nordic character according to Norwegian rules (including Sami): A Á B C Č D Ð E F G H I J K L M N Ŋ O P Q R S Š T Ŧ U V W X Y Z Ž Æ Ä Ø ...


4

I'd avoid this. Anyway, here's how you can do it. Note that accented characters and possible ligatures have to be braced. I made some adjustments: anysize is much less powerful than geometry and has not been maintained in 26 years; the here package is obsolete; use float instead, but never use [H]; the minipage doesn't seem needed, particularly with width 2\...


3

If you have already the converted PDF files, here's a version that works with all engines: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{graphicx,stringenc} \usepackage{xparse,l3regex} \ExplSyntaxOn \tl_const:Nn \c_coloremoji_dir_tl { ./emoji_images/hires } \tl_new:N \l_coloremoji_input_tl \cs_new_protected:Npn \coloremoji_unicode:nn #1 #2 { \includegraphics[#1]{...


3

All what you need to do is add the following two lines in preamble of your document: \usepackage[croatian]{babel} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} and than normally use keyboard (assumed that it is prepared for Croatia language).


3

If you use XeTeX or LuaTeX, you can also use the fontspec package. \documentclass[utf8]{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \title{Mačak u vreći} \author{Pero Perić} \begin{document} \maketitle \section{Probni znakovi} šđžčć ŠĐŽČĆ \end{document} I seem to be having less problems that way than trying to change inputenc and fontenc.


3

\directlua expands input in an \edef-like fashion. You should always watch for expansion: here we have ~, which is expanded if you don't protect it: \documentclass{beamer} \newcommand{\test}[1][n==3]{% \directlua{% local fin = "\unexpanded{#1}" repeat n = math.random(1,5) tex.print(n .. " ") until assert(load("...


3

Here's a possible 'hacky' solution using \blacksquare from the AMS package (if you want to avoid conflict between textpos and pmboxdraw packages). $\blacksquare\!$% with amssymb package I think unlike in the case of \textblock, \blacksquare has white spacing as seen from using \fbox. They are also of different sizes, so you might take that into account, ...


3

One way forward -- hopefully feasible for you -- is to switch to either LuaLaTeX or XeLaTeX and to load the fontspec package. All you will need to change in the document is (a) comment out (or delete) the instructions \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} and \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} in the preamble and (b) add the instruction \usepackage{fontspec}. Of course, the ...


3

For XeLaTeX, prepare a file ktunaxa.map containing ; TECkit mapping for TeX input conventions <-> Unicode characters LHSName "ktunaxa" RHSName "UNICODE" pass(Unicode) ; ligatures from Knuth's original CMR fonts U+002D U+002D <> U+2013 ; -- -> en dash U+002D U+002D U+002D <> U+2014 ; --- -> em dash U+0027 ...


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