121

I just installed the recommended fonts and it worked for me. =) The command for a Debian based Linux distribution (including Ubuntu and Mint): sudo apt-get install texlive-fonts-recommended


115

In addition to the reasons listed by @ShreevatsaR why the T1 font encoding is advisable even when writing (primarily) in the English language, there are two more reasons that were missing from his list: TeX is only able to apply ligatures and kernings between characters when these characters are real glyphs from the same font. In OT1 (with 128 glyphs) you ...


97

In this case, the missing file is ecrm1000.tfm according to the error message. To know which package it belongs to, you can use the command tlmgr search --file ecrm1000.tfm --global which finds it in package ec. So you have to install it with tlmgr install ec. Then you may have other errors, other files to look up and other packages to install. Since the ...


57

Do you Know the package cmap (look at CTAN:cmap)? It does this for you. Load it with \usepackage{cmap} as first package. Update: I did a little research and found some hints how to use cmap or mmap. Result: cmap and mmap can't handle fonts based on virtual fonts (files *.vf or *.vpl in the font directory). So if your used font needs virtual fonts cmap or ...


47

The glyph makes much more sense visually when seen as a ligature of long s and round s, one of the two traditional forms of the ß (the other, of course, being long s and z). Here's a comparison, using outlines from cm-unicode, version 0.6.3a: Here I've used f as a reference for the first part of the ligature, since I couldn't find a long s in cm-unicode. So ...


41

To avoid messing up anything else in a document, siunitx is set up to avoid loading font packages and the like. As such, it uses its 'own' version of the \textminus and \textmu, and sets up a minimal amount of support for that. However, that confuses microtype, as you've seen (it should be harmless). Loading textcomp 'fixes' this as siunitx then uses the ...


34

Fonts in LaTeX are characterized by four independent attributes: Encoding Family Series Shape The encoding refers to the "output encoding"; commonly used ones are OT1 (classical TeX fonts) and T1 (Cork encoding for European languages), but also TS1 is found (Text Symbols); other encodings are T2A T2B T2C (for cyrillic), T3 (IPA glyphs), T4 (African ...


29

Essentially in pdf every letter (or run of letters) is positioned by coordinates so even a normal word might be encoded as individual letters positioned to "look" like text, so as to take account of inter-letter kerns etc. Math is no different: the characters are just normal font characters positioned on the page at locations that TeX has determined. ...


27

It is for the Polish ł and Ł (l and L with stroke). Plain TeX contains \def\l{\char32l}. And LaTeX (OT1enc.def) defines \DeclareTextCommand{\l}{OT1} {\hmode@bgroup\@xxxii l\egroup} where \@xxxii stands for char32. \documentclass{article} \begin{document} \char32l \l \end{document}


22

From plain.tex: 663 \def\l{\char32l} 664 \def\L{\leavevmode\setbox0\hbox{L}\hbox to\wd0{\hss\char32L}} The glyph is used just for the Polish “suppressed l”. The support for Polish in Computer Modern is not complete, as the ogonek is missing, but, apparently, Knuth didn't need to typeset Polish names sporting the ogonek.


22

The error happens when LaTeX is reading line 538 in the bibliography file, probably generated by BibTeX. The entry refers to an author named Patrycja Dynarowicz-Łątka (a chemist at the Jagellonian University in Kraków) whose name, in BibTeX-speak, becomes Dynarowicz-{\L}{\k{a}}tka, where you see \k. Just add \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} to your document ...


21

Font encoding Because of deficiencies of the OT1 encoding I also recommend T1 font encoding: \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} For example OT1 contains inconsistencies in the encoding for different families, typewriter is different, … Also \usepackage{textcomp} is useful for getting other symbols (Euro, …). Instead of Computer Modern/EC I would use ...


20

The package mmap does a little bit more than cmap, it also works for mathematical symbols in your pdf. So if your pdf does not use mathematics use \usepackage{cmap}. If you have problems with ligatures further on with computer modern use \usepackage[resetfonts]{cmap}. With mathemtic symbols use \usepackage{mmap}. If you have still problems use \...


20

In case you are on Fedora: sudo dnf install texlive-collection-fontsrecommended.noarch


20

For Classic TeX using tfm files the kerning and ligature information is in the ligtable in the tfm file. That is a binary file but there is a human readable version of it "property list" format, and a tftopl utility to convert the file: On the command line (texlive version, other implementations may vary slightly) tftopl cmr10.tfm Produces a long list of ...


20

Doing locate /t2a | grep 'texlive/2012/texmf-dist/tex/latex/.*\.fd$' outputs, on my updated TeX Live /usr/local/texlive/2012/texmf-dist/tex/latex/antt/t2aantt.fd /usr/local/texlive/2012/texmf-dist/tex/latex/antt/t2aanttc.fd /usr/local/texlive/2012/texmf-dist/tex/latex/antt/t2aanttl.fd /usr/local/texlive/2012/texmf-dist/tex/latex/antt/t2aanttlc.fd /usr/...


20

inputenc is abandoned because it does absolutely nothing with XeTeX or LuaLaTeX. Better said, it would do bad! See fontenc vs inputenc Essentially, the task performed by inputenc is translating input characters into their LICR form. With an 8 bit engine, « is two byte long and inputenc is able to translate them into \guillemotleft and » into \...


19

Based on this LaTeX website, there are following solutions for your problem. According the subsection "indirekte Eingabe von Umlauten" you can write \"A, \"O, \"U, \"a, \"o, \"u and \ss{} or {\"A}, {\"O}, {\"U}, {\"a}, {\"o}, {\"u} and {\ss} to get german letters. If you include the german or ngmerman (ngerman has the new hyphentation rules), you can write ...


19

Would this alternative approach suffice? \documentclass{article} \begin{document} \begingroup\ooalign{P\cr L}\endgroup \end{document}


18

TeX fonts have only 256 slots. And you can't mix encodings without telling LaTeX to do it; \textcyrillic defined by babel with the russian option does this. The last specified encoding becomes the default one. This should be a complete list of sans serif fonts available also in T2A encoding (for cyrillic): \documentclass{article} \usepackage[T2A,T1]{...


18

I can't do anything about the font you are using but would recommend to use the lmodern fonts, a modernised variant of the Computer Modern fonts. \documentclass{minimal} \usepackage{lmodern} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \begin{document} \begin{center} Große Straße ließen gießen maßen heißt Spaß Fuß Maß Gruß reißend \end{center} \...


18

I don't know why Knuth designed the ß as it is in the cm-fonts. I don't quite remember why Jörg Knappen changed the look of the ß in the ec-fonts, but I do remember that there was some quite heated discussions about the choice. If you don't like both ß there is no much you can do (apart from redesigning the glyph yourself). But as the cm-super fonts ...


17

Summary The correct answer is indeed the solution of Gernsheim with \RequirePackage{pdf14} right at the beginning before \documentclass. Details The minor version of the PDF file is set by \pdfminorversion in pdfTeX (Older versions are using \pdfoptionpdfminorversion). The version number is written in the very beginning of the PDF file: %!PDF-1.4 The ...


17

(As many readers tend not to follow links all the way through, and as links can die, this reproduces relevant bits of stuff referred to in the answer by bubba.) I agree with the observation in the question. When I pick up one of Knuth's books from the library, the reading experience is different from when reading a typical book typeset with LaTeX. And the ...


17

fontspec doesn't change the math setup to unicode math fonts -- this is done by unicode-math -- it only change some math alphabet like \mathrm and with the option no-math you could avoid this too. So if you have a good (sans-serif)math setup that works with pdflatex or with lualatex and luainputenc you can use it with lualatex and fontspec too. Beside ...


16

As you don't provide a minimal example, I am not sure if this really addresses your problem. Have you tried loading glyphtounicode.tex? \documentclass{article} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \input glyphtounicode \pdfgentounicode=1 \begin{document} ff ffi ffl ä ü ö ß auffallen \end{document} However, even without using ...


16

The main problem is in the usage of the OT1 encoding, instead of T1; in the former, the đ and Đ characters are constructed and the construction doesn't work well with the TX fonts. Switching to T1 has also the benefit that words containing letters with diacritics will be hyphenated properly, which doesn't happen with OT1. \documentclass[onecolumn,11pt]{...


16

The basic rule is: Try if you get better results using \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} in your document. The explanation: when you write English text you can probably get by without this line and you will not experience any differences/difficulties in most situations. When Knuth introduced TeX, he shipped it with the font called 'Computer Modern'. This font has ...


16

plain.tex includes \def\_{\leavevmode \kern.06em \vbox{\hrule width.3em}} latex.ltx includes \DeclareTextCommandDefault{\textunderscore}{% \leavevmode \kern.06em\vbox{\hrule\@width.3em}} and \DeclareRobustCommand{\_}{% \ifmmode\nfss@text{\textunderscore}\else\textunderscore\fi} but t1enc.def includes \DeclareTextSymbol{\textunderscore}{T1}{95} ...


16

Upon further reading, I just found a solution here. Install the cm-super package. It will install T1-compatible versions of the Computer Modern fonts. No need to import anything more or to change the document. Now with \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} the output looks like:


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