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5

It's a mixture of standard \mathcal and Euler Script: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage[mathscr]{euscript} \begin{document} \[ \langle\mathcal{O}\rangle=\int\mathscr{D}g\mathcal{O}[g]e^{-\mathcal{S}[g]} \] \end{document} (Sorry, but I just can't write the Euler constant upright.)


3

Posting this as an answer, since it worked for you: You want to use TeX Gyre Heros, the clone of Helvetica that ships with TeX. In PDFTeX, the code for this is, \usepackage{tgheros} \renewcommand*\familydefault{\sfdefault} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} If your document uses fontspec, you instead want: \setmainfont{TeX Gyre Heros} \setsansfont{TeX Gyre Heros}


3

You can use microtype as shown in How do I disable ligatures?: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage{xparse}% not needed in recent kernels \usepackage{xspace} \usepackage{microtype} \DisableLigatures{encoding=T1, family=tt*} \NewDocumentCommand{\code}{m}{\texttt{{#1}}} \begin{document} My code is \code{cout << hello << ...


2

It's much better if you use fonts that cover the necessary glyphs. For a handful of missing glyphs, you can do like the following. For text in Goudy Sans Black, \' becomes different and fakes the acute. No problem if you use ú, that's already a single Unicode character, so the accent will not be faked. Note \newfontface instead of \newfontfamily, as you are ...


2

listings processes the input, and you can redefine the output you get for an input. Replace the xx/yy with whatever you want: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{lmodern} \usepackage{relsize} \usepackage{listings} \lstset{ basicstyle=\itshape, } \makeatletter \lst@CCPutMacro \lst@ProcessOther {"5F}{% \lst@ttfamily {xx}% used with ...


1

I’m going to do a frame challenge here. You (practically) never want to do that. Your file in either of those cases is actually going to use a font in the OT1 encoding. There are no fonts that ship with TeX in the Windows-1252 encoding. If your PDF reader thinks the document is using a different encoding than it really is, that’s not good. It might not be ...


1

You can setup listings to format the code the way you want. The option literate allows you to replace characters on the fly: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{lmodern} \usepackage{relsize} \usepackage{listings} \lstset{ basicstyle=\itshape, literate={_}{\textscale{.6}{\textunderscore}}1 } \renewcommand{\_}{\textscale{.6}{\textunderscore}} \begin{...


1

I would recommend that you use unicode-math if you can, and legacy 8-bit fonts if you have to. If you can use unicode-math, add the command \setmathfont{TeX Gyre Termes Math}[Scale=MatchLowercase] If you are using PDFTeX, load the package \usepackage{newtxmath} You might need to give beamer the professionalfonts option to turn off sans-serif math.


1

I was going to suggest old-school \'ü, but Goudy Sans Black BT does not have separate accent characters (acute or umlaut). An embarrassing answer that works somewhat for appearance, but not for textual honesty or searching, is \section{{\protect\boldmath$\acute{\mbox{ü}}$} Math Acute}


1

The correct syntax is \newfontfamily\ben{kalpurush.ttf}


1

A nuance: To expand on the comment about using unicode text. It turns out that ℝℕℚ are in the Letterlike Symbols unicode block, which in turn means that they could be covered by the text font, and indeed, for Noto Serif font (as an example), they are. To get them to appear in the fontface being used for math mode (Fira Math, say), the font used for math mode ...


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