New answers tagged

0

\llap seems not to be the best solution. There are significant differences between the original and the \llap ..ted word. \rm \def\myspace#1{#1\hskip2pt\hbox{#1\llap{#1}}}% \myspace{Difference}% \vskip\baselineskip \def\myspace#1{#1\hskip2pt\hbox{#1\llap{#1}}\vskip\baselineskip} \myspace{Difference}% \tt \def\myspace#1{#1\hskip2pt\hbox{#1\llap{#1}}}% \...


0

You were spacing by a fixed amount ignoring the width of the letter. plain tex (and latex) has an \llap macro that overprints its content to the left taking no horizontal space \newdimen\test \test=1Em \def\myspace#1#2{#1\hbox{#1\llap{#1}}\vskip\baselineskip} % \magnification=2200% Example : \myspace{A}{-0}% \myspace{A}{-1.084}% \myspace{B}{-1.084}% \...


3

I presume David answered your font related questions? The "analog clock" really is just a pie chart. Try this: \documentclass{beamer} \usepackage{tikz,pgf-pie} \def\pieofprogress{% \begin{tikzpicture} \tikzset{lines/.style={draw=black, thin}} \pie[rotate=90, hide number, sum=auto, radius=.2, color={white,black},every only number node/.style={...


0

Fonts will be stored not under the texmf-local/tex directory tree but rather under temxf-local/fonts. TeX Live includes some ttf fonts by default under fonts/truetype and I would probably keep a similar structure for any fonts that I installed under texmf-local.


0

The default font for \texttt is Computer Modern Typewriter. To use that font you can use \ttfamily to select the Computer Modern Typewriter family (Latin Modern Typewriter in XeTeX to allow for enhanced Unicode support). (and 4.) There is no font family called monofont. As a result, you got the warning: LaTeX Font Warning: Font shape `TU/monofont/m/n' ...


3

it's made with lualatex and beamer using these fonts (not all of which are free): $pdffonts matrices.pdf name type encoding emb sub uni object ID ------------------------------------ ----------------- ---------------- --- --- --- --------- RWJBVP+GillSans-Light CID TrueType Identity-H ...


8

You look in the file mathabx.dcl for \leftleftharpoons and \rightrightharpoons to find \DeclareMathSymbol{\leftleftharpoons} {3}{mathb}{"D8} \DeclareMathSymbol{\rightrightharpoons} {3}{mathb}{"D9} Now you know that you need the font called mathb, which you find in mathabx.sty \DeclareFontFamily{U}{mathb}{\hyphenchar\font45} \...


1

If I run the simplified code (with choice of the font by file name because I haven't it installed as a system font, but it's irrelevant) \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \setmainfont{Ubuntu}[ Extension=.ttf, UprightFont=*-Regular, BoldFont=*-Bold, ItalicFont=*-Italic, BoldItalicFont=*-BoldItalic, ] \begin{document} \textsc{Lorem not ...


3

You need to (a) increase the leading (your setting has zero leading) and place the \par directive before rather than after the final } curly brace. The following screenshot shows the difference between 0pt, 5pt, and 10pt of leading. (The horizontal lines are there just to indicate the vertical extent of the title material.) What the "right" amount ...


1

The unicode-math package selects an OpenType math font, and overrides all legacy math fonts. This is so that loading legacy font packages will not break unicode-math. There is an OpenType version of Euler compatible with unicode-math. See this answer for more details on how to use it. In many documents, a simple \setmathfont{Neo Euler}[Scale=...


1

An alternative solution through the fontsize package. It is based on scrextend but it is totally independent from KOMA. \documentclass[a4paper]{article} \usepackage[fontsize=6pt]{fontsize} \usepackage{lipsum} \begin{document} \lipsum \end{document} Here is a minimal working example which shows some features of the package: \documentclass[a4paper]{...


0

I ended up combining the information from the answers to this question. I used the algorithm from this answer with a piece of code I found in the isomath package as suggested in this answer). Concretely, I created a command to distinguish between numbers and non-numbers, as follows (I am not quite familiar with the explsyntax from the original answer): \...


1

The unicode-math package for LuaLaTeX or XeLaTeX lets you do what you want (except for automatically changing the case) with the right package options. Here, I choose a font where 𝟏 and 𝟭 are more distinct than the default. \documentclass{article} \usepackage[math-style=ISO, bold-style=ISO, sans-style=italic]{unicode-math} \usepackage{libertinus} \...


2

You can exploit the fact that math alphabet choices are not cumulative. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fix-cm} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{bm} \DeclareMathAlphabet{\mathsfit}{T1}{\sfdefault}{m}{sl} \SetMathAlphabet{\mathsfit}{bold}{T1}{\sfdefault}{bx}{sl} \ExplSyntaxOn \RenewDocumentCommand\vec{m} { \bm { \text_lowercase:n { ...


6

The beamer class redefines some of the fonts at \begin{document}. This is so it can support font packages you load in the preamble after the \documentclass. If you move the \savebox from the preamble into the document, it will see that beamer changed the math letters to sans-serif italic and use the same fonts as other math. \documentclass{beamer} \...


2

\newcommand\unstyle[1]{\textcolor{normalcolor}{#1}} $\blue{x^3 + 2x \unstyle{+ x} - 12}$ $x^3+2x+x-12$ Of course, this doesn't work in standard LaTeX, but it could be adjusted. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{xcolor} \newcommand{\blue}[1]{\textcolor{blue}{#1}} \newcommand{\unstyle}[1]{\begingroup\normalcolor#1\endgroup} \begin{document} $\blue{x^3 +...


-1

One trick proved to be useful. You can open your eps files generated from Matlab with a notebook, and replace all Helvetica into Arial. Then compile again to generate a pdf. It works now!


1

You are using \lettrine and in its first argument your code inserts a \stepcounter command. That is dangerous as \lettrine uses this argument to calculate sizes. Move the \stepcounter command before the \lettrine: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{lettrine} \begin{document} \newcounter{init} %this fails: %\lettrine{\stepcounter{init}\theinit}{text} text %...


1

The best way to have BOTH the text AND the math is just by adding: \usepackage{cmbright} in the preambule of the LaTeX document. It gives a nice and homogenous look to your document. Cheers!


1

I fixed my problem by removing from the mydocumentclass.sty the command : \renewcommand\familydefault{\sfdefault}. It forced the font to be Sans Serif. It wrote the following code in the file mydocumentclass.sty : \setmainfont{Barlow} [Path=./Barlow/, Extension= .ttf, UprightFont= *-Regular, ItalicFont= *-Italic, BoldFont= *-Bold, BoldItalicFont = *-...


2

In today's tex systems embedding is the default, and you need to actively disable it. If you do it, you can see it in the font list. E.g. here I forced helvetica to be not embedded and then it misses the "Eingebettete Untergruppe" keyword: If I switch back to embedding it looks like this (now a clone is used for helvetica):


0

I think this code will help you to get started. Of course you should get a suitable "tree" for the side image. % !TeX TS-program = pdflatex \documentclass[12pt,legalpaper]{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[margin=2cm]{geometry} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage[ placement=top, position={0,...


0

It's not difficult to adapt the answer given in this answer: Randomized fonts for handwritten look to use fontspec instead of the PSNFSS naming system used by the old fonts. We just need to change \rndfont command to use the name of the font family defined using \newfontfamily: \newcommand*{\rndfont}{\pgfmathrandomitem\z{fontlist}\csname\z\endcsname} ...


0

In PDFLaTeX, \documentclass{article} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage{cmbright} \usepackage[paperwidth=10cm]{geometry} \renewcommand\familydefault{\rmdefault} \begin{document} Text in Computer Modern Roman, \textsf{and Computer Modern Bright.} \end{document} To change only the sans-serif text font, and not the default font or the math fonts: \...


2

Your example with \dimexpr is not understandable for me, so for TeX too. Of course, you cannot use \dimexpr in the typesetting material without any context. But you can use \raise\hbox primitive construction and set the _ as an active character when the parameter of the \filename is read: {\catcode`_13 \gdef_{\raise.35ex\hbox{\string_}} } \def\filename{\...


1

If you don't need backslashes in the file names, you can do with the following: \documentclass{article} \ExplSyntaxOn \NewDocumentCommand{\filename}{m} { \aldric_filename:n { #1 } } \str_new:N \l_aldric_filename_str \tl_new:N \l_aldric_filename_tl \cs_generate_variant:Nn \tl_replace_all:Nnn { NV } \cs_new_protected:Nn \aldric_filename:n { % ...


3

You can define the character for Unicode and classic tex as part of a general setup for Stix2 as follows \documentclass{article} \usepackage{iftex} \iftutex \usepackage{unicode-math} \setmathfont{Stix Two Math} \else \usepackage{stix2} \fi \begin{document} $ a \wedgeq b$ \end{document} If you just want the single character then unicode-math ...


2

You can level your subscripts by placing them in a \raisebox and lowering them by the difference between the subscript’s height and the desired level (here, the x-height of the font). This involves saving the subscript in a box and measuring its height. \documentclass[12pt]{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{settobox} % For \settoboxheight \newbox{\...


1

The particular package you’re looking for was uploaded to a FTP site by the author, nearly twenty years ago. It’s neither in CTAN nor the Internet Archive, but maybe someone still has a copy. Fonts that have a similar shape for \varphi include stix, stix2 and newpxmath, or unicode-math with XITS Math, STIX Two Math or TeX Gyre Pagella Math. If you find an ...


2

As Ivan brought up in the comments, the scrreport class (which is the Koma-Script version of report) sets all headings to be sans-serif by default. The manual says that you can change this with \addtokomafont{part}{\normalfont\bfseries} \addtokomafont{partnumber}{\normalfont\bfseries} But there’s also a class option for it. \documentclass[...


5

What you need is a bit tricky because ConTeXt is dealing with precomposed characters. A solution would be to manually apply a split for accented characters into non accented characters and combining diacritical marks (Unicode range 0300–036F). Here's a list of other types of features you can define in ConTeXt . Then you color combining marks so you get the ...


1

To follow up on one of your other questions, Asana Math is a clone of Hermann Zapf’s Palatino and Young Ryu’s Pazo math font. It therefore matches Palatino (or its clone, TeX Gyre Pagella). This is an attractive, safe choice and the only knock on it is that it might be overused. Xapf’s Optima (and its clone URW Classico) is an excellent sans-serif ...


0

To supplement STIX Two (Stix2), I use the Adobe Source Sans and Source Code families. Stix2 and Source Sans are the official typefaces of Gardner-Webb University of North Carolina, while (without Stix2) Source Sans and Source Serif are used by Stanford University [6]. STIX Two is related to Times New Roman, as others have noted. Times New Roman has narrow ...


3

Option abstract=true enables the automatic heading of the abstract. So if you want to use an own abstract heading, remove option abstract=true. Then you can use eg. \addsec*{\abstractname}: \documentclass[ %abstract=true% <- remove this option, if there should be no automatic heading in the abstract ]{scrartcl} \usepackage{blindtext}% only for dummy ...


2

LuaTeX manages the encoding for lmroman-regular10 via lmroman-regular10.lua In that file, we can see, for example, that it has [72]={ ["boundingbox"]=12, ["index"]=62, ["name"]="H", ["unicode"]=72, ["width"]=750, }, which directs the letter H to the index of 62 in the otf font ...


1

From what you see in the scrartcl.cls file, the abstract environment uses the \sectfont command to format the "Abstract" title in one column document: \begin{center} {\normalfont\sectfont\nobreak\abstractname \vspace{-.5em}\vspace{\z@}}% \end{center} We could redefine this command, but this would also affect other commands ...


10

That H is more similar to Euler Script bold, or perhaps the \mathcal font from MathTime Pro. It would be possible to use that font you found in LuaLaTeX or XeLaTeX. Here is a version that uses Neo Euler: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{unicode-math} \usepackage{newcomputermodern} \setmathfont[range={cal,bfcal}, Scale=MatchUppercase]{Neo Euler} \begin{...


6

I would recommend doing this in LuaLaTeX. This code needs a version from 2020 or later. \documentclass{article} \tracinglostchars=2 % Warn if the current font is missing a glyph \usepackage[paperwidth=10cm]{geometry} % Format the MWE for TeX.SX \usepackage[english]{babel} \usepackage{unicode-math} \usepackage{uninormalize} % Some packages can only handle ...


2

It is \usepackage[light,math]{iwona} \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage[light,math]{iwona} \begin{document} % bottom of page 2 in the linked document In addition, we have the following assumptions: \begin{itemize} \item $X_{t-1}\in\mathbf{B}(X)$ and $X_{t-1}\cap X_{t'-1}=\emptyset$, $\forall t\ne t'$. \item $A_t\in\mathbf{B}(A)$ and $...


0

According to the Lyx documentation, you want to change Qt framework’s settings for the menu fonts, using qtconfig .


1

I found the solution here: Using a fancy font for mathmode, falling back to XITS for missing symbols Just adding the desired commands to the range of \setmathfont does the trick: \setmathfont{Latin Modern Math}[range={frak,\bigcap,\bigcup}] I guess something similar applies to other operators such as \bigoplus, \prod, \sum, etc.


11

It seems a “standard” Garamond: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{ebgaramond} \usepackage{microtype} \begin{document} \begin{center}\Large In nomine dei summi Incipit prologus Gregorij\\ scriptoris huius libri \end{center} \textls{PRVDENTIUM} \textsc{sane uirorum} ad hoc prae \end{document}


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