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To expand on the latin-in-chinese topic: Two parts: The first part is that Babel does not change the font according to which Unicode block the glyphs are in, like package ucharclasses does. Addendum: But see the comment about recent Babel. The second part is that Noto Serif CJK SC contains some non-CJK glyphs as well. Noto Serif has glyphs for Latin, ...


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It is indeed the case that the Latin glyphs from "Noto Serif CJK SC" is notably lighter than the corresponding weights from "Noto Serif". I am not aware of any documents explaining this design choice. However, it is worth noting that the Latin glyphs from "Noto Serif" would look like a (slight) emphasis within a span of Chinese text. One can see this in ...


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You could try the (new) multiscript option. But you will get a few warning from fontspec: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[english]{babel} % babelprovide for *english* (default language of the document) \babelprovide[ main, import, language = Default] {english} % babelprovide for *chinese-simplified* \babelprovide[ import, ...


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Unless your TeX distribution is of neolithic vintage, the following code should work for you. Observe that loading the fontspec package is optional. The newtxtext and newtxmath font packages contain code that adjusts various settings depending on whether the document is compiled with pdfLaTeX, XeLaTeX, or LuaLaTeX. Aside: Instead of specifying left=1.85cm, ...


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it is saved in \fontdimen7\font: \listfiles \documentclass[12pt]{article} \usepackage[english]{babel} \usepackage{csquotes} \begin{document} Some nonsense words \textquote[p.\,2]{This is a special quote.} Some nonsense. Some nonsense words \textquote[p.\,2]{This is a special quote.}\hspace{\fontdimen7\font} Some nonsense. \end{document}


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With a recent babel (see What's new in babel-3.38), you just have to tell it to switch the language (the line breaking rules) and the font based on the script in the following way : \documentclass{article} \usepackage[english]{babel} % Don't reload english, just modify it to switch the language and the % font depending of the script: \babelprovide[...


1

If you find a font where you like the y glyph, then you can setup the math font in your document to use this secondary font for this single character only. Note that this usually does not produce good results, because it is generally quite visible that the character is from a different font. The substitution can be done using the range option for \...


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