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I, (OP), hacked this answer together after trying to interpret the Fontspec and Libertine package documentation. I am not quite sure how or why this works, but it does ... If someone could delete these initial comments and add explanation, it would be very helpful, specifically: How do we know which font features are available to a specific font. Is ...


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This works again with fontspec version 2.7d, released 2019-10-19.


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Without a keyboard layout, or the time to select characters from a character map (plus also running on battery), mapped fonts become a feasible option. First two lines = original text (with slightly different spelling to examples cited) pasted from https://www.sacred-texts.com/hin/rvsan/rv01001.htm Red text: IAST-based transliteration (mapped font) of ...


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If no keyboard layout is available, mapping a font in xelatex is possible. The decision is what alias (string) to give to each glyph. There are a lot of glyphs, and optimally, typing should be minimised. One method is to use IPA numbers as the alias, similar to how Egyptian hieroglyphs have a numbering scheme: (Source of IPA numbers: Wikipedia) but the ...


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The package pmboxdraw contains definitions for such characters, which are drawn as lines. In pdfLaTeX this works directly, if you use the characters in the main text. Inside lstlisting you need to define such characters separately in lstset, see How to use extended ASCII characters in the lstlisting environment?. For more characters see the pmboxdraw manual ...


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2019/10/18 update Will clarified this issue to be an oversight of fontspec in his comment. I propose the following temporary patch before the next release of fontspec. The patch works under pdfLaTeX, XeLaTeX and LuaLaTeX: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{libertine} \renewcommand\ttdefault{lmtt} % Temporary patch \makeatletter \AtBeginDocument{% \@...


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LaTeX support packages authored by me include small-caps if, and only if, small-caps were available in the fonts at the time the packages were created. venturisadf is a complicated case, because some glyphs are taken from different fonts roughly in accordance with the stated intentions of the fonts' designer. In essence, the LaTeX package provides three ...


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I've gotten a good year of use of Ulrike's answer (thank you!), but there is now a better way. Or maybe it was always there and I never noticed it. In any case, this is a straight-forward way of doing it with fontspec's ScaleAgain facility: \setmonofont{Latin Modern Mono}[ Scale = MatchLowercase , ScaleAgain = 0.9 , ]


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Resolving the issue was simply running the update both in user and admin modes. The answer was given by @ulrike-fischer


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You do not need to change anything since Cormorant-Regular.ttf does contain the smcp feature necessary for fontspec to use real small caps: $ otfinfo -f Cormorant_Install_v3.601/1.\ TrueType\ Font\ Files/Cormorant-Regular.ttf | grep smcp smcp Small Capitals An alternative way to see this is provided by fontforge that you mention in the comments. With ...


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The Pagella family uses "TeX Gyre Pagella" as family name. The italic shape is called "TeXGyrePagella-Italic". In addition, you are not setting a font family but a single font, so it makes more sense to use \newfontface. Overall, the following works for me using TeXLive 2019 on Debian Linux: \documentclass[english,a4paper,12pt]{article} \usepackage[bold-...


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You can try \newfontface\headingfont{TeXGyrePagella-Italic} or \newfontfamily\headingfont{TeX Gyre Pagella}\textit{...}


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The problem is, that xelatex dosen't find the font by name. To fix that, you have to specify the font file: \documentclass[a4paper,12pt]{article} \usepackage{libertine} \usepackage[bold-style=ISO]{unicode-math} \newfontfamily\headingfont{texgyrepagella-italic.otf} \begin{document} \headingfont XX \end{document} If you run pdffonts you can see, that the ...


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Install the Right Packages If you are running a manual installation of TeX Live 2019, then the TeX Live package tex-gyre-math ought to contain the file, and fc-match ought to be able to find it there. Re-run tlmgr install tex-gyre-math and tlmgr update --self --all as whatever user owns the TeX Live installation. Running sudo fc-cache -fsv to rebuild ...


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Latin Modern Roman has only two font features for ligatures: otfinfo -f lmroman12-regular.otf | grep lig has the output: dlig Discretionary Ligatures liga Standard Ligatures If you do not want a warning then use: \setmainfont[ Ligatures={NoCommon, % liga NoRare,% dlig }]{Latin Modern Roman}


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\documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \usepackage{enumitem} %I don't have this font and you want teh updated verison with Unicode ordering. %\newfontfamily\ngg{NewGardiner} \newfontfamily\ngg{Segoe UI Historic} %you do not need a counter and want to start from 77824 not 13000 %\newcounter{nw} %\setcounter{nw}{13000} %\renewcommand{\theenumi}{\...


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With the Combining Diacritical Marks unicode block, you can build up the sequence of marks by hand, so to speak. They will follow the order you specify. And they will pile up (and under) for as many as you specify. So you can create your own combinations if you need to. Manually adding marks: first line is ordinary text pasted in from the MWE; second ...


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It may be the meaning(s) of the term 'ligature' could be the driver behind the question. This is a comment with images, so not an answer. The original post (also not an answer, more of an observation) is kept down below, for continuity. Assuming the question is about indexing transliterated content, then there is a method that involves no decomposition of ...


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Carlito Calibri On a Mac you will want to use Carlito font: \documentclass[a4paper]{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \setmainfont{Carlito} %\setmainfont{Calibri} %only on Windows \begin{document} The Calibri font is only available on Windows but Carlito is a drop-in replacement from Google that has the same metrics. \end{document}


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As pointed out in the comments, I was just confused by MS Word's fake bold/fake italic: An .otf font file contains only one font.


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The acronym package does not seem to have an interface for this. One possibility is to patch the command that actually is used for printing the list: \documentclass[a4paper, oneside, 12pt]{scrbook} \usepackage{fontspec,etoolbox} \usepackage[printonlyused]{acronym} \newfontfamily\myfontfamily{Roboto} \makeatletter \patchcmd\AC@@acro{] #3}{] \myfontfamily#3}...


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The MWE can be reduced to \documentclass{article} \usepackage{babyloniannum} \renewcommand{\theenumi}{\babyloniannum{enumi}} \begin{document} \begin{enumerate} \item rozhodovat se na hraně zajímavého \end{enumerate} \end{document} There are two problems. One is in the package, one is in your code. The \babyloniannum is fragile, as defined, so it ...


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In normal text, phi is only one glyph, and the font makes it upright, bold, italic, bold-italic. In math text, there are a dozen phi glyphs, and the boldness, italic is part of the glyph itself: To have upright lower case Greek, use \setmathfont{Asana Math}[math-style=french], for example, and use \mitphi for italic phi. \documentclass[12pt]{article} \...


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For chapters, sections, &c., titles , you can load titlesec and add declarations such as \titleformat*{\chapter}{\sffamily} to your preamble (see §2, Quick reference, in the documentation. For more sophisticates needs, you may have to use the Advanced interface. Title, author, date of a document are the just obtained with declarations in the preamble, ...


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