78

I know this question is old and surely OP doesn't need it anymore, but recently I had similar problem and I think my solution answers the question. First thing to note is that in Mathematica FrontEnd cells can have arbitrary styles. Each styles appearance is customizable by a stylesheet. With default stylesheet even most basic cell styles i.e. Input and ...


78

edit: As noted by @Sean Allred, datetime has been superseded by datetime2. Using the package datetime with the option yyyymmdd as \usepackage[yyyymmdd]{datetime} you just change the value of \dateseparator to replace the default / by - (or -- if you want). \renewcommand{\dateseparator}{--} Also as noted by @Vincent, you can define your own date format.


77

Although this question is quite old (only found it because lockstep reactivated it) it’s maybe worth to add this information. For my lectures on LaTeX I use the following image to explain the way LaTeX categorizes the different characteristics of printed material. 1. Encoding The first thing to select is how the font is encoded in it’s file(s), that means ...


62

Let's construct what you're after: 12 point text font For this you can pass a 12pt option to the document class. For example, use \documentclass[12pt]{book} Times New Roman font While there is no actual Times New Roman font in native LaTeX, the closest you'll get is by adding the mathptmx package \usepackage{mathptmx} or the newtx bundle \usepackage{...


62

Numbers can be used in a printed document in two different meanings: as symbols representing mathematical objects (note that “1” is not “the number one”, but one of its possible representations, hence a symbol) or words. A number used in the second meaning is, for instance, a date or the reference to a page. Mathematical symbols should have the same shape ...


52

This is a simple solution: \usepackage[figurename=Fig.]{caption} Works with and without babel. Use tablename for tables.


48

There is a very simple way to do it. Using \rule[depth]{width}{height}, I know you didn't provided a Minimal Working Example, but here it is a very simple example: \documentclass{article} \begin{document} blah blah \rule{1cm}{0.15mm} blah blah \end{document} The code produces the following output


43

My solution needs no packages. The only thing you need to know is that the primitive registers \day, \month and \year include the desired information: \def\mydate{\leavevmode\hbox{\the\year-\twodigits\month-\twodigits\day}} \def\twodigits#1{\ifnum#1<10 0\fi\the#1} The date in my format: \mydate.


37

In some cases, you might want to suppress the number on a footnote. I looked around the web, and a few suggestions were out there, but the simplest one I could find was the following: \let\thefootnote\relax\footnotetext{Put your text here}


37

In addition to the previous answers, a further reason might be that at some later point you consider changing fonts. It may happen that you end up choosing a font that uses different numerals for mathematical and ordinary text, or that you are even choosing different fonts for mathematical text and for ordinary text. This actually happened to Don Knuth, see ...


35

You can do this with BibLaTeX without much hackery by putting the following in your preamble: \newcommand{\makeauthorbold}[1]{% \DeclareNameFormat{author}{% \ifnumequal{\value{listcount}}{1} {\ifnumequal{\value{liststop}}{1} {\expandafter\ifstrequal{##1}{#1}{\textbf{##1\addcomma\addspace ##4\addcomma\isdot}}{##1\addcomma\addspace ##4\addcomma\...


33

Your issue is "font-dependent". Background Indeed, special shapes of a font (bold, italic, slanted, small caps) are not defined relatively to a main font (its regular shape), but independently. The "bold version" of a font is defined per se (it is an independent *otf, *.ttf-file you can install and use, even if you don't have the main/regular version), and ...


32

If anyone came across this question and is using subcaption, here is a solution (borrowed from its excelent manual): \documentclass{article} \usepackage[labelformat=simple]{subcaption} \renewcommand\thesubfigure{(\alph{subfigure})} \begin{document} Reference the sub-figure in full form: \ref{sf1}. Referencing just the sub-figure parts: \subref{sf1} and \...


32

You can add heading=subbibliography when issuing \printbibliography. Also, load biblatex with the option defernumbers=true when printing different bibliographies with different types. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{lipsum} \usepackage[defernumbers=true]{biblatex} \addbibresource{NZSM446.bib} \begin{document} \section{Sections Available} \subsection{...


31

Unfortunately I have used a table and I hope that I have helped you, also. \documentclass{article} \begin{document} \begin{tabular}{@{}p{.5in}p{4in}@{}} Approved: & \hrulefill \\ & Fats Domino, Ph.D. \\ & Chair of the Department of Nutrition\\ \end{tabular} \end{document}


31

it can be seen that the epsilon symbol and R are vertically misaligned First off, your screenshot does not show either \epsilon or \varepsilon. Instead, it shows a symbol that's produced in TeX and LaTeX by the macro \in. When read out loud, this symbol is usually pronounced (in English) either as "in" -- hence the name of the macro... -- or as "is element ...


30

Let's make soul work less: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{xparse,soul} \ExplSyntaxOn \NewDocumentCommand{\ulns}{m} { \seq_set_split:Nnn \l_tmpa_seq { ~ } { #1 } \seq_map_inline:Nn \l_tmpa_seq { \ul{##1}~ } \unskip } \ExplSyntaxOff \begin{document} \ulns{The quick brown fox jumped} over the lazy dog. \end{document} Basically, the argument is ...


30

That's exactly what \emph does: \documentclass{article} \begin{document} \emph{In the \emph{Smith} case, the Supreme Court held\dots} \end{document} or, if you prefer to manually control that, then you can use \textup: \documentclass{article} \begin{document} \textit{In the \textup{Smith} case, the Supreme Court held\dots} \end{document}


30

Maybe these posts can help you along a bit: A: Force figure placement in text B: How to use the placement options [t], [h] with figures? C: How to influence the position of float environments like figure and table in LaTeX? Some general suggestions from these posts (and from me): Use options like [h] (here), [b] (bottom), [t] (top), [p] (seperate page) ......


29

Assuming you do want fixed line ends: \documentclass{article} \newcommand\dob[1]{\textbf{#1}} \newenvironment{boldfirst}{\obeylines\everypar{\dob}}{} \begin{document} \begin{boldfirst} Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisci elit, sed eiusmod tempor incidunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ...


28

I would add: csquotes Use csquotes rather than entering quotation marks manually. There are several ways to use the package. I tend to use the following in my preamble: \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage{csquotes} \MakeAutoQuote{‘}{’} \MakeAutoQuote*{“}{”} The package will automatically switch from inner to outer quotes, at least for 2 levels ...


27

I'd like to take a crack at this question, because 5 years ago I landed here and thought titlesec was the best way to do this. That may or may not be true. The class settings are perhaps obvious to experts, but rather obscure to new users of LaTeX. $(kpsewhich -var-value TEXMFDIST)/tex/latex/base/article.cls For the 2016 version, this would result in /...


26

As of biblatex 3.3 cgogolin's answer no longer works. This is due to changes in the \DeclareNameFormat macro (see https://github.com/plk/biblatex/issues/372 for a discussion). I was eventually able to modify cgogolin's macro to work, with the following as the solution: \newcommand{\makeauthorbold}[1]{% \DeclareNameFormat{author}{% \ifthenelse{\value{...


26

\smash the right paren, so that it doesn't push up the \overline:`` \documentclass{article} \newcommand\showdiv[1]{\overline{\smash{)}#1}} \begin{document} \(\showdiv{12345} \) \end{document} If you don't like the curvature of the right paren, you can squeeze it a bit (here, I squeezed it perhaps a bit too much, to 50% of its original width, just to ...


26

You don't need the before key; just revert to \normalfont for the label and apply \itshape; by using [description] as optional argument to \setlist only this environment will be affected. For the bullet, you can easily do it by slightly abusing the font key: \documentclass[12pt,a4paper]{article} \usepackage{enumitem} \begin{document} \setlist[description]{...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible