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21

There are other font that can be used: MnSymbol: FdSymbol: TX fonts: PX fonts: cjhebrew: OpenType fonts (LuaTeX/XeTeX): Latin Modern Math: Asana Math: XITS Math: TeX Gyre Pagella Math: TeX Gyre Termes Math: Linux Libertine: GNU FreeFont/FreeSerif: GNU FreeFont/FreeSans: MnSymbol \documentclass{article} % \usepackage{MnSymbol} % Definitions ...


20

For completeness sake, here is an answer using ConTeXt's font colour schemes feature (using Arabic, but should apply to any scripts): First write a font “goodies” file containing categories of glyphs names (glyph name are font dependant, so you've to check the font you are using) that should share the same colour (it is just a lua script): -- save as '...


15

LuaLaTeX is your choice! Greek is possible without any adjustments. Hebrew, as it is a language from right to left, needs adjustments. Of course, you need to use \usepackage{fontspec} in the preamble (as is usual when using LuaLatex). Greek You need a font that supports all the accents. If your mainfont for latin text does not support them, you need to ...


10

Hebrew babel redefines all the counter representation mechanism and lipsum relies on \roman for its inner workings. You can change a macro in lipsum: \usepackage{lipsum} \makeatletter \renewcommand\lips@dolipsum{% \ifnum\value{lips@count}<\lips@max\relax \addtocounter{lips@count}{1}% \csname lipsum@\romannumeral\c@lips@count\endcsname \...


10

As far as my research in the net has been able to find, hyphenation in Hebrew is used mainly (or even uniquely) in newspaper typeset in narrow columns. There are no hyphenation pattern files for Hebrew that I know of; surely not on CTAN. The message you get is a long standing misfeature of babel, which, when it doesn't find hyphenation patterns preloaded ...


10

It's easy to do with fontspec and an Opentype font that has that symbol; its code is U+20AA. This requires compiling with Xe/LuaLaTeX. Here is an example with DejaVu Sans. I define a \NIS macro: \documentclass[a4paper,12pt]{article} \usepackage{fourier} \usepackage[no-math]{fontspec} \setmainfont{Heuristica} \setsansfont{DejaVu Sans} \newcommand\NIS{\char"...


10

Put the \textenglish{aaa} block inside the same \uline: \documentclass[a4paper,numbers=noenddot]{scrartcl} \usepackage{fontspec} \PassOptionsToPackage{normalem}{ulem} \usepackage{ulem} %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%% User specified LaTeX commands. \defaultfontfeatures{Scale=MatchUppercase, Ligatures=TeX} \newfontfamily\hebrewfont[Script=Hebrew]{David CLM ...


9

I am not sure I understand the difficulty. If you use xelatex, polyglossia, and an appropriate font (e.g., Ezra SIL), there is no problem in producing Hebrew with Nikkud. Here is a short example, which I am sure you can expand: \documentclass[a4paper,12pt]{article} \usepackage{polyglossia} \setmainlanguage[calendar=hebrew]{hebrew} \setotherlanguage{...


9

It looks like \alph (or rather, \@alph) is redefined to use the macro \@hebrew@numeral, which produces these numbers. I'm redefining it to first look up if a number is bad and print something different if this is the case. The output will be unchanged otherwise. Bad numbers are declared using \newbadnum{<number>}{<good representation>}, which I ...


8

You can use Artyom Beilis' BiDiTex, which pre-processes a (La)TeX file to reverse parentheses and enclose numbers in appropriate macros. The documentation lists the problem you mention exactly, in section 1... that's the motivation for writing that utility. Using the question's MWE: \documentclass[english,hebrew]{article} \usepackage[utf8x]{inputenc} \...


8

As already mentioned using XeLaTeX and polyglossia is the only way to go. Nice fonts are available for free from the Culmus Project, the Society of Biblical Literature and SIL International. Btw., fonts from these three sources also work nicely with nikkud (vowel signs) and te'amim (cantillation signs). If I am not mistaken, the very nice Frank Ruehl font ...


8

Pobably this is not a package conflict, but rather the lack of babel support for Hebrew. A possible solution (not tested) is to install the package IvriTeX (Hebrew package for the babel system and LaTeX2e). To install in a Debian system: apt-get install ivritex In other case go to http://ivritex.sourceforge.net/ Another solution is to remove hebrew from ...


8

I suggest you to try XeLaTeX and Polyglossia; in my experience, installing full Hebrew for babel has been painful. Not that I know any Hebrew, but I had to typeset some text in that language. Here's an example. You may need to change the font name; what font to use depends on your operating system, but any OpenType or TrueType system font supporting Hebrew ...


8

That looks like a bug in bidi (egreg thinks) but you can force things back with \beginL \documentclass{article} %\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}% don't use fontenc with xetex \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{polyglossia} \setotherlanguage{hebrew} \setdefaultlanguage{english} \showoutput \begin{document} \[\{ x\,|\,\text{\beginL one two three\endL}\}\] \end{...


7

You can use the tabbing environment; below there are some examples (the example is in Spanish, but that's not so relevant) of the use of this environment and a brief description of its main commands: \documentclass{article} \begin{document} \begin{tabbing} Programa\quad \= : \= \TeX \\ Autor \> : \> Donald Knuth \\ Manuales \> : \\ \qquad\= The ...


7

To apply this to every paragraph, you can use \parshape and \everypar; the following example shows this approach; the indentation is controlled throught the \iiindent length (set in the example to 15pt); since Hebrew is written right-to-left, the indentation is on the right: \documentclass{report} \usepackage{lipsum} \newlength\iiindent \setlength\iiindent{...


7

Update: I’m no longer sure that what I wrote below is correct, namely this specific composition does not seem to be part of Unicode normalisation and this seems to be a HarfBuzz “feature” (or misfeature for the case of Ezra SIL). This is a font bug. The font has a U+FB1D HEBREW LETTER YOD WITH HIRIQ character whose glyph has the hirq positioned high. This ...


7

You can use the cjhebrew package and add in the source file the following : \cjRL{t} \documentclass{standalone} \usepackage{cjhebrew} \begin{document} Some text, a hebrew charcacter: \cjRL{t} \end{document} This gives the following output:


7

If you find a Hebrew font, you can use it; in this example I use the fonts provided by the cjhebrew package. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} % from cjhebrew.sty (with scaling added) \DeclareFontFamily{U}{cjheb}{} \DeclareFontShape{U}{cjheb}{m}{n}{% <-11> s*[1.2] cjhblsm <11-> s*[1.2] cjhbltx }{} \newcommand{\cjhebfamily}{\...


7

You can use babel. As of version 3.19, you don't even have to mark up for simple things. See §1.27 of the babel manual. %! TEX program = lualatex \documentclass{standalone} \usepackage[nil,bidi=basic]{babel} \babelprovide[import=en-AU,main,mapfont=direction]{australian} \babelprovide[import=he,mapfont=direction]{hebrew} \babelfont{rm}[Ligatures=TeX]{Linux ...


7

For some reason, David CLM does not seem to contain Latin glyphs with an Italic shape. As an additional oddity Miriam Mono CLM slants in the opposite way to the other two fonts. In your question, you have set the default language to Hebrew and the default font to David CLM. So this is what you get in your header. If you want English in your header and the ...


6

At first: I doubt a bit that you actually want to use \setkomafont. This will also reset the size of font in the section title to the normal size. Better use \addtokomafont. At second: The source of your problem is that – regardless what you do with \setkomafont –inside the \section command the KOMA-classes issue a \sffamily. So temporarly there is a switch ...


6

This is not an answer. I was able to produce the minimal working example as: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{hyperref} \TeXXeTstate=1 \def\neweverypar{{\setbox0\lastbox\beginR\usebox0}} \let\origeverypar=\everypar \def\everypar#1{\origeverypar{\neweverypar#1}} \begin{document} This is \href{http://google.com}{Google} and ... \end{document} after runing ...


6

You should look into using XeTeX. With XeTeX, you can integrate all of your system fonts right into your document. You would be able to use this font with the MWE below. %!TEX TS-program = xelatex %!TEX encoding = UTF-8 Unicode \documentclass{article} \usepackage{xltxtra} % loads: fixltx2e, metalogo, xunicode, fontspec \defaultfontfeatures{Mapping=tex-...


6

Looks like your font does not have a symbol for \textbullet. A quick hack is to take it from another font, for example, using enumitem to globally redefine the label of itemize, \usepackage{enumitem} \setlist[itemize,1]{label={\fontfamily{cmr}\fontencoding{T1}\selectfont\textbullet}} This uses \textbullet from Computer Modern Roman on the first level of ...


6

For some reasons, \maketitle gets redefined twice, and the second time \HyOrg@maketitle (what hyperref uses to store the old meaning of \maketitle) points to itself, thus creating a loop. This seems to happen when the Hebrew language is loaded. The following trick should help. However, it seems a problem with ucthesis, because the issue doesn't appear with ...


6

Update babel's BIDI support is coming along nicely, and it's now possible to do this relatively painlessly. babel seems to be being more actively developed than polyglossia, so this is likely to be increasingly the way to go. It also works with both xelatex and lualatex. \documentclass{article} \usepackage[nil,bidi=default]{babel} \babelprovide[import=en-...


6

Chapter titles are typeset in sans serif in scrbook. So you need to define also a sans serif hebrewfont: \documentclass[11pt]{scrbook} %\usepackage{libertine} \usepackage{polyglossia} \setdefaultlanguage{english} \setotherlanguage{hebrew} \newfontfamily\hebrewfont[Script=Hebrew]{Linux Libertine O} \newfontfamily{\hebrewfontsf}[Script=Hebrew]{...


6

You're nearly there. As pointed out in the comments, you don't use the general fontspec commands (\setmainfont, \newfontfamily\hebrewfont{}). Instead babel has its own way of specifying fonts. See §1.14 of the babel manual. You don't even have to directly load fontspec. I also like to use \babelprovide for all languages and load babel using \usepackage[nil,...


6

There are a few different free versions of David on the Web. A good resource is the Open Siddur project. Here, I use David CLM from the Culmus project, but you might also try David Libre. For the matching English font, I picked TeX Gyre Bonum, a clone of Bookman. \documentclass[12pt]{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \usepackage[bidi=default, english]{babel}...


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