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20

Although it's not completely clear what your question is asking, I would recommend using XeLaTeX and the polyglossia package for Bengali. This way you just enter your Bengali text in regular form. I used the Akaash font from here: Free Bangla Fonts. Since I don't speak Bengali, I translated a short text from English using Google Translate. My apologies ...


13

There's currently no interface for changing all numerals to Devanagari ones. However you can define your own: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \usepackage{polyglossia} \setdefaultlanguage{hindi} \setotherlanguage{english} \setmainfont[Script=Devanagari]{Nakula} \newcommand{\devanagarinumeral}[1]{% \devanagaridigits{\number\csname c@#1\...


12

If you use this font, fontspec will tell you in the log-file: Could not resolve font Sanskrit 2003/B (it probably doesn't exist). This means that the font has no bold (/B) version. You can use the AutoFakeBold key to get a faked bold: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \setmainfont[Script=Devanagari,AutoFakeBold=3.5]{Sanskrit 2003} \begin{...


12

The problem with polyglossa is that its support for Bangla (or Bengali) is quite limited. This prompted me to write a new package latexbangla, which extends the former's functionalities and addresses most of the Bangla related typesetting issues. It also provides full support for common commands and environments, automatic transition from Bangla to English (...


12

If I understand well what you are expecting, you want a document written in English, but with sanskrit quotes within. For this, you may use the package polyglossia and define your main language (English) and other sub languages for the document (for example sanskrit here). In your case, you will also need to declare the fonts for sanskrit, a possibility is ...


11

The ucharclasses package makes this possible. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \usepackage{polyglossia} \usepackage[Latin,Devanagari]{ucharclasses} \setmainfont{Devanagari MT} % Maybe Sanskrit 2003 doesn't need the following line; % in this case change \devanagarifont in the \setTransitions % commands to \normalfont \newfontfamily{\...


11

This sort of page layout is definitely possible in TeX. I'll first show a way to do it in plain TeX, because I understand it a bit better than I understand LaTeX. Let's look at what we have in the image from the question: Main content area This is just running text, with appropriately chosen line breaks and page breaks. This is the bread-and-butter of TeX,...


8

As of 2019, both babel and polyglossia support Tamil on XeLaTeX. LuaLaTeX does not currently work with Indic scripts, but there is also an experimental project integrating Harfbuzz and LuaLaTeX that should work. The babel package supports more languages and engines, while the polyglossia package has a somewhat simpler user interface. Either of these let ...


7

Just to update, devanagari now works beautifully in recent betas. There was a bug in how the opentype features were handled, but it has been squashed. To use devanagari, simply define a font with the devanagari-one feature set: \definefont [Deva][file:chandas.ttf*devanagari-one] \starttext \Deva श्रेयो हि ज्ञानमभ्यासाज्ज्ञानाद्ध्यानं विशिष्यते । \crlf ...


7

For the sake of completeness, here's how this can be done using the skt package. Note that I do not recommend this. The skt package is anachronistic. It comes from a time before XeTeX and LuaTeX, from a time where free and easy use of Unicode fonts was not available and where ASCII-only input was the norm. There is every danger that this package will not ...


7

The skt.c source looks positively ancient. It just needs a small adjustment for me on Cygwin to compile again: diff --git a/skt.c b/skt.c index 1d34f11..8f8b2f4 100644 --- a/skt.c +++ b/skt.c @@ -43,7 +43,7 @@ void search (void); void write_outbuf(void); void write_line (char *); char * str_find (char *, char *); -void getline (void);...


7

You can use XeLaTeX: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{polyglossia} \setmainlanguage{marathi} \setmainfont{ITF Devanagari Marathi} \begin{document} काशक्यनाही? तुझेनावकायआहे?” “वाह !कायहलकंहलकंवाटतं य” तूकधीयेणारआहेस? कधीघड ले? मगतुलाधरलेकसे? तुम्हीक सेओळखले? कुणीसांगितले? हेकामकुणीकेले? कधी, कसे, कु णी, किती. \end{document} The support for Marathi ...


7

I fear that this is pushing even the ancient and hacked btparse library to its limits. It can deal with most Unicode for initials generation but not combining diacritics. However, biber has its own extended name format for just this situation, simply change your .bib to: @BOOK{अर्जुनवाडकर, AUTHOR = {family=अर्जुनवाडकर, given=कृष्ण}, TITLE = {मराठी...


7

The babel package, running on LuaHBTeX (that is, LuaLaTeX from 2020 or later), supports this through the mapdigits feature. This example will change the digits to Devanagari in page numbers, chapter numbers, the table of contents, etc., and in Marathi text, but not in English text or math mode. %% This MWE requires LuaHBTeX 1.12.0 or later. \...


6

Save the test file as test.dn and run on it the devnag program: devnag test.dn This will produce a test.tex file \def\DevnagVersion{2.15}\documentclass {article} \usepackage{devanagari} \begin{document} {\dn \7{g}no\381w\qq{r} aEn \3FEwm\qq{n}} \end{document} that you can run pdflatex on getting what I assume is correct output (but I don't read ...


6

I will give what I learned by trial and error. This is pertaining to Windows platform. ( I used the material given found here at the XeLaTeX wiki.) The trick is to use the fonts available in the system's font directory. (Windows7 provides Latha font for Tamil) and compile your source file with xelatex, not pdflatex! (For this in Windows platform, '...


6

You're being very unlucky: if I add \tracingparagraphs=1 in the document, the log file shows the attempts made by XeTeX at line breaking; I also put \hspace*{0pt} at the start, so that hyphenating the first word will be possible. @firstpass @secondpass []| \EU1/TeXGyrePagella(0)/m/n/10 a-sma-dā-di-vi-śe-ṣa-ṇa-śū-nya-syā-rtha-sā-kṣ ā-tkā-ri-tva-mā-tra-syai-...


6

Download the manual.tex file from here and compile it. A table is given on page 8. Here is a screenshot.


6

Here is a possible solution using the Saab font. I don't know anything about the Gurmukhi script, and the Saab font doesn't seem to recognize the Gurmukhi script tag, even though it should, so there may be problems with the font. For small sections of Punjabi text, this may be sufficient. For whole documents you would need to write your own version of a ...


6

I downloaded RomDev.map from https://github.com/somadeva/RomDev Then I ran teckit_compile -u RomDev.map which produced the file RomDev.tec. In the same working directory, I copied the file from the blog page you're referring to and compiled it, getting, for the relevant part Then I proceeded to make the files available to the TeX system. With superuser ...


6

Generally speaking, the current state is that xetex (via the harfbuzz library) is better at shaping indic scripts than luatex at the present time. I can't read this or comment which is more correct but your test file produces in xelatex and in lualatex. 2018 update With current luatex, if you give it a hint to use the deva feature rather than dev2 ...


6

Right-click on U+0936 and look at the “Substitutions” tab of the “Glyph Info” in FontForge; it tells you that the forms you want are controlled by localization, not by stylistic sets: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec,polyglossia} \setdefaultlanguage{Sanskrit}% https://tex.stackexchange.com/a/382981 \setmainfont{NotoSerifDevanagari-Regular.ttf}[...


6

Short answer: For the text in the question, you can use: {\dn m\?r\? mAtA aOr EptA ko smEp\0t.} Longer answer follows. Recommended way (XeTeX and Unicode font) In general, to type Devanagari in (La)TeX, it is best to use a Unicode-aware engine like XeTeX [or LuaTeX, but LuaTeX's support for Indic (and most non-Latin) scripts is rather poor]. For example, ...


6

Here is an example with script Kannada (knda in the above list). The (typical) problematic cases for the other scripts will be similar, just have to pick the corresponding codepoints from the other scripts. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \setmainfont{NotoSansKannada-Regular.ttf}[Script=Kannada] \begin{document} % U+0C95 KANNADA LETTER KA ...


6

[(i) Added an extra operation in the Lua function 'conv' to address the OP's follow-up request. (ii) Implemented Ulrike Fischer's suggestion to use ^^^^ notation to typeset 4-byte characters. ] Since you're using LuaLaTeX, here's a solution that employs a Lua function to convert strings of the form '<U%+(.-)>' to '^^^^%1'; here, %+ represents the ...


5

\documentclass{report} \usepackage{fontspec} \setmainfont{[Kalpurush.ttf]} \newfontface{\en}{[Chapaza Italic.ttf]} %%this is optional, if you want to use a secondary font. Any english font is supported \begin{document} \chapter{আমি বাংলায় গান গাই। } এখন খুব সহজে বাংলা ফন্ট ব্যবহার করুন\\ {\en fontspec} প্যাকেজ এবং {\en XeLatex} ইঞ্জিন এর সাহায্যে।\\ {\...


5

As of 2019, it is also possible to do this using the babel package and XeLaTeX. (There’s an experimental project with Harfbuzz and LuaTeX that should support it as well.) \documentclass{article} \usepackage{babel} \usepackage{fontspec} \babelprovide[main, import]{english} \babelprovide[import]{tamil} \defaultfontfeatures{Scale=MatchLowercase} \babelfont{...


5

As mentioned by others in this post, T1 fonts come with 256 code points; besides, to the best of my understanding you cannot use Unicode fonts that make use of CTL (Complex Text Layout) features with pdflatex. If your operating system is relatively new, in all probability it already supports Complex Text Layout (CTL). In such a case you may try using xelatex ...


5

Using the polyglossia package, it works quite well in XeLaTeX: \documentclass[preview, margin=0.5cm]{article} \usepackage{polyglossia} \setmainlanguage{english} \setotherlanguage{bengali} % Replace this with whatever font you're using \newfontfamily\bengalifont[Script=Bengali]{Akaash} \title{\textbengali{ইংরেজি} and Bengali} \begin{document} \maketitle ...


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