19

Would this alternative approach suffice? \documentclass{article} \begin{document} \begingroup\ooalign{P\cr L}\endgroup \end{document}


16

For completeness, there is a Georgian font package for pdflatex, see https://www.ctan.org/pkg/mxedruli. The Tar character is part of the Xucuri set, which can be accessed with \usepackage{xucuri}. The input is a set of ascii-based character combinations, with Ⴒ made by .T. Note that the character looks a bit different, like the difference between a serif and ...


15

Since the April 2018 release, LaTeX considers UTF-8 as default input encoding Thus calling \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} at the start is no longer required. If a file has a different encoding than UTF-8, the proper encoding should, of course, be declared. The utf8x add-on, together with the ucs package, used to be needed for some special application or, ...


9

Getting hold of a proper resource for generating patterns is not just a matter of volunteer effort. The U.S. and British patterns were derived from commercially published dictionaries. The source of the U.S. patterns is identified in Frank Liang's dissertation (a copy of it is on the TUG web site), and the British patterns are based on an Oxford mini-...


8

It is possible to do this with babel. This new preamble should work with your document, so long as you used \textenglish and \begin{sanskrit} instead of \devanagarifont. It requires luahbtex (lualatex in TeX Live 2020 works), but has a bug with xetex (as of July 2020). \documentclass{article} \tracinglostchars=2 \usepackage{iftex} % For \ifluahbtex, \...


7

There are a few options to use Georgian in LaTeX. A simple one is to use a font that supports the Georgian alphabet, such as DejaVu Serif, and compile with XeLaTeX or LuaLaTeX. Tested in Ubuntu Linux: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \setmainfont{DejaVu Serif} \begin{document} Some fonts support Georgian: კატები ყველგანაა \end{document} Result:...


6

I don't have your second font. But with the engine luahbtex and luaotfload version > 3.11, your example looks like this: \documentclass[landscape]{memoir} \usepackage{fontspec,polyglossia,url} \newfontfamily{\burmeseFamily} {NotoSerifMyanmar-Regular.ttf}[Renderer=Harfbuzz,Script=Myanmar] \begin{document} \burmeseFamily င်းကွန်းင်းလောင်းတော်ကြ...


6

You would use the T8M/T8K encodings. This requires the georgian CTAN package, which on TeX Live 2019 should be installed to texmf-local. \documentclass{article} \usepackage[T8M,T8K,T1]{fontenc} \usepackage{amsmath} \newcommand\mathTar{\mathord{\text{\usefont{T8M}{cmr}{m}{it}\symbol{"93}}}} \begin{document} \( \mathTar = P \cdot L \) \end{document} As ...


5

Here's a LuaLaTeX-based solution. It consists of a Lua function called french_punctuation_spacing that does all of the work and two LaTeX utility macros called \FrenchPunctuationSpacingOn and \FrenchPunctuationSpacingOff, respectively, which activate and deactivate the Lua function. % !TEX TS-program = lualatex \documentclass{article} \usepackage{luacode} ...


4

The accepted answer is good, but doesn’t say how to install this package. First, if you can possibly run LuaLaTeX or XeLaTeX, and use Unicode fonts instead, you should. It’s much simpler and works much better. Otherwise, read on. If your distro has packages that install these files for you, you should use those. On Debian or Ubuntu, you can look for an ...


4

I would recommend http://www.cjvlang.com/mongol/silkroad.html (for a non-propaganda page, that is, not for a solution). With David Carlisle's kind assistance, I could typeset Mongolian top-to-bottom, left-to-right using plain XeTeX, but had no idea how one might do the same in a XeLaTeX environment until I read a 2013 contribution by Brian Ammon. I ...


4

Documentation (p 58) says non-final vowel (in Manju) is entered as vowel+*, which gives this table: Is that what you mean? MWE: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{mls} \begin{document} \begin{tabular}{cccc} \ & \ & \huge b & {\Huge \mabosoo{b}} \\ \ & \ & \ & \ \\ \huge a* & {\Huge \mabosoo{a*}} & \huge ba & {\Huge \...


4

The arabic.ldf of babel (and also the arabtex package) make many changes to various commands which can clash in various places (e.g. in the combination of minitoc and microtype). Both are also rather old and haven't been changed since many years as most people use xelatex or lualatex for such scripts. If you need arabic only for a few works and want to ...


3

You can create a nynorsk module by making a file datetime2-nynorsk.ldf containing \ProvidesDateTimeModule{nynorsk} \RequireDateTimeModule{norsk} Just put the file in the same directory as your .tex file, or in a path contained in TEXINPUTS. Then \documentclass{article} \usepackage[norsk,nynorsk]{babel} \usepackage[useregional,calc]{datetime2} \begin{...


3

The default pandoc template for LaTeX output appears to force shorthands=off in the babel options. Indeed, after running pandoc -D latex >default.latex, you should see: \PassOptionsToPackage{unicode=true}{hyperref} % options for packages loaded elsewhere (...) $if(lang)$ \ifnum 0\ifxetex 1\fi\ifluatex 1\fi=0 % if pdftex \usepackage[shorthands=off,$...


3

babel redefines the command @arabic, it no longer gives a number and makeindex doesn't like this. You can try this: \usepackage{glossaries} \makeatletter \renewcommand*{\gls@arabicpage}{\number\c@page} \makeatother Then the entries will at least appear. The formating of the page numbers are perhaps wrong, but this could be changed in another place. This ...


3

Adding to Dominique's and Corentin's answer here's my take on this: \lstdefinestyle{python}{language=Python, morekeywords={super}, ... % more settings for python language } \lstdefinestyle{c}{language=C, ... % settings for C language } ... \begin{lstlisting}[style = python] ... super \end{lstlisting} % changing language \begin{lstlisting}[...


3

It seems to be Bitstream Charter text with Math Design math. It is just an x, not chi. Use \usepackge[charter]{mathdesign} to employ this type of font. More information about free fonts in Latex, see enter link description here


3

you need CJKecglue = {⟨glue⟩} 设置 CJK 文字与西文、CJK 文字与行内数学公式之间的间距,默认值是一个空格。使用这个选项设置的 ⟨glue⟩ 最好也要用一定的弹性。请注意,这里设置的 ⟨glue⟩ 只影响 xeCJK 根据需要自动添加的空白,源文件中直接输入的 CJK 文字与西文之间的空格不受影响(直接输出)。有时候 xeCJK 可能不能正确地调整间距,需要手动加空格。 Set the distance between CJK characters and Western characters, CJK characters and in-line math formulas. The default value is a space. The ⟨glue⟩ set ...


3

Because \c is not expandable (neither is \': try \show \lang_and to see), and it explodes with x expansion. Either use \tl_const:Nn or use \exp_not:n { romanian=\c{s}i } to avoid the expansion of \c – Phelype Oleinik


3

I can see no reason for \inputencoding{latin1} after loading utf8; a token list constant; x expansion. Most likely you want \prop_gset_from_keyval:Nn \g_erwann_lang_and_prop { croatian=i, czech=a, hungarian=\'es, romanian=\textcommabelow{s}i, slovak=a, slovenian=in }


3

[Disclaimer/Disclosure: I'm a support personnel at Overleaf.] If you need to compile your project using pdflatex (perhaps due to a journal publisher requirement), then your code just needs a few more changes: Assuming that you want to typeset your document in mainly Arabic with some English sections, you should load arabic as the last option for babel, or ...


2

Here is a tool gtexfix which I wrote which does the replacements of LaTeX commands and math formulas by tokens automatically. It helps to translate safely .tex documents with Google Translate without breaking the LaTeX.


2

Package options cannot be applied after the package has been loaded, so move \RequirePackage{babel} at the end. Second, don't use non-ASCII chars (like å). And third, the name is \PassOptionsToPackage (note the “s”).


2

First off, you don't want the main language is Arabic, do you? Second, arabtex does several redefinitions that clash with the document class; leave it out. You also need to restore a Latin output encoding. \PassOptionsToPackage{arabic}{babel}% <---- CHANGE HERE \documentclass[a4paper,twoside]{ociamthesis} \fancyfoot[C]{\emph{DRAFT Printed on \today}} ...


2

For pdflatex you can use solution based on changing category code of characters: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} % saving original quotes representation \let\gll\guillemotleft \let\glr\guillemotright % new quotes representation \def\frenchguillemotleft{\gll~} \def\frenchguillemotright{~\glr} { \catcode`\:=\...


2

Your requirements are somewhat vague, but if what you need are some short texts written in the Yi script, here is how you can do it with babel 3.38, just released, and luatex: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[english]{babel} \babelprovide[import=ii, onchar=ids fonts]{yi} \babelfont[yi]{rm}{FandolSong} \begin{document} Thus ꆏꂴꐊ (ne miep qo) “You walk ...


2

To add to the answer, do you need a mapping file? e.g., with mapping latin to yi, you can type jjo and it produces ꐥ. If you need to do only a few syllables, you can define individual macros for them, like \newcommand\yipuo{^^^^a044}. Mapping is useful when you need to type a lot of text and do not have a keyboard or input method editor for the script. A ...


2

babel seems not (yet) to offer very much help with Nuosu, although it does recognize sichuanyi. However, for short texts or isolated words, something like this suffices: % compile with lualatex or xelatex \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \setmainfont{Noto Serif} \newfontface\yi{NotoSansYi-Regular.ttf} \begin{document} {\yi ꐥꅍꀋꐥ}: everything’s ...


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