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73

You can write to the aux file with \write\@auxout{hello} or \immediate\write\@auxout{hello2} or \protected@write\@auxout{}{hello3} Depending on requirements. \immediate\write writes to the specified file at that point, expanding the supplied tokens (like \edef) so fragile commands will do the wrong thing. \write does not write at that point it puts a ...


65

Please add your resources to this answer! Multilingual A Short Introduction to LaTeX2ε by Tobias Oetiker et al. (online, but also included in MiKTeX and TeX Live) Bulgarian, Chinese, Czech, Dutch, English, Finnish, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Mongolian, Persian, Polish, Portuguese, Brazilian Portuguese, Russian, Slovak, Slovenian, Spanish, ...


44

Final Status October 2013 --- eBook is now available with a special promotion price until the end of the year I'm happy to announce that there is finally an eBook version of "The LaTeX Companion, 2ed" available. It was a rather challenging exercise due to the many examples in the book and the need to reproduce the example output faithfully on that media. ...


37

Also worth reading: “LaTeX for Complete Novices”  by our highly esteemed TeX.SE member Nicola Talbot. It’s available in the WWW on http://www.dickimaw-books.com/latex/novices/, where you can get 3 PDF versions (2 different paper formats and a version for screen viewing), a HTML version and the sources. Very recently the A4 PDF version was also added ...


33

\in@{\foo}{\cslist} % <--- What combination of \expandafter is needed here? If \foo is first expanded, then we have the problem, that \expandafter cannot jump over serveral tokens at once, also the number of tokens is not known. Therefore the latest token is expanded first. But at this stage we cannot add the \expandafter, because we have to insert the \...


32

Depends on who's defining "nicely". If you live within its constraints, you can get a lot done. But one major difference is how inline math is formatted, especially with single-spaced body text. TeX derivatives tend to handle that sort of thing much better. Example: Word can't squeeze a Fourier series (a sum and a set of fractions) into a single baseline of ...


28

In my time of heavy LaTeX use during my studies of mathematics, I proof-read quite a lot of articles and theses written by friends and collegues. I noticed that beginners tend to load loads of packages because they simply copied their document preambles from someone who (hopefully!) knew what he was doing, entirely ignorant as to what each of the twenty or ...


28

If I understand your question correctly, you want to know what is the minimal set of tools you need to be familiar with in order to use LaTeX to write technical documents. I'll try to summarize these here, and how they work together. I'll keep this answer fairly schematic, and point you to many other questions on the site which will provide some more ...


26

The TeXbook is the best place to learn about the underlying TeX language, although TeX-by-Topic (texdoc texbytopic) in most distributions is a good free alternative. But much of what you show is not directly using TeX primitives but using constructs such as \list defined in the latex format. The LaTeX Companion has detail for that or the free documented ...


25

LaTeX is enough if what you want to do is to produce neater documents with fewer errors. TeX is worth knowing if you want to write new programs, macros etc. LaTeX is about presenting content, while TeX is about formatting. Choose your interest.


25

TUG have pages for both 'consultants for hire' and 'jobs advertised. You could consider using these to find the appropriate person.


24

I only partially concur with the standpoints of the other answers. It certainly is good to avoid fiddling with typographic layout too much if you don't know (yet) what you're doing. Most novice users come from a MS Word background and are used to deal with typesetting differently, so in order to get to (good) terms with LaTeX, one should try to accept the ...


23

You should read the TeXBook. It doesn't cover everything (as you say, it doesn't cover e-TeX for example). But if you have digested the the TeXBook then you can pick up the rest as needed. The e-tex manual can be skimmed over in a few minutes if you know the basics, xetex similarly. Not that you gain mastery of all the extra commands in a few minutes, but ...


22

I think that Leslie Lamport answered this question beautifully in the first chapter of his book LaTeX: A Document Preparation System: Think of LaTeX as a house built with the lumber and nails provided by TeX. You don't need lumber and nails to live in a house, but they are handy for adding an extra room. Most LaTeX users never need to know any ...


22

You can exploit \unexpanded: \documentclass{article} \makeatletter % both arguments are expanded once \newcommand{\xxin@}[2]{% \begingroup\edef\x{\endgroup \noexpand\in@{\unexpanded\expandafter{#1}}{\unexpanded\expandafter{#2}}% }\x } % the first argument is expanded once \newcommand{\xnin@}[2]{% \begingroup\edef\x{\endgroup \noexpand\in@{\...


22

\in@{\foo}{\cslist} If you don't need pure expansion and can afford an assignment, that can simplify things \def\tmp{\expandafter\in@\expandafter{\foo}} \expandafter\tmp\expandafter{\cslist} only needs four \expandafter


21

The ` there has no connection to the use of ` to get the character code of a symbol, it should be read as \ifx\@tempb` \edef\next.... that is if the two tokens \@tempb and ` are equal then define \next to be something. They will be equal if for example \@tempb had been defined by \let\@tempb=` or (if I recognise that code fragment:-) if it had been ...


20

About credible sources To address the concern of the investor of the bounty, I think the most credible sources are the books written for learning LaTeX and the manuals written for learning the packages. We can also say that the package and class writers are credible sources, since they have enough experience with LaTeX and TeX to create the packages. But ...


19

For me, I find that The LateX Companion by Mittelbach and Gossens. It is very useful especially for troubleshooting purposes when compiling errors when the code gets more sophisticated. I am writing a book and subdivide into chapter by file. Chapter 1 one tex file. The master file controls the overall includes bibliography cover page,preface etc. For one ...


19

The Art of LaTeX is a 100-page intro to the subject with a lot of parallel "LaTeX-code : typeset-result" examples throughout the text. A companion book, The LaTeX Math Companion, does the same with math in LaTeX. They are filled with examples, well-formatted and cross-indexed. Written by Helin Gai, formerly of Duke University. In practice the source I ...


17

I have found the best way to learn LaTeX (or any programming language) is to find a simple project that you can do that will make you learn the new material. I have found that working a real world example is the only way to really do it. For example, try writing your next paper in LaTeX, but make sure that you give yourself enough time to write the paper and ...


17

You can find out what any command does by asking LaTeX itself. Just open up a console window and run latex (or whatever variant you prefer), and then you can issue commands line by line. For example, to find out what \z@ means, you can use $ latex **\makeatletter *\show\z@ and LaTeX will give you > \z@=\dimen12. (The \makeatletter command allows you ...


16

This answer is based upon teaching a Latex class to math majors for 15 years. Assumption: The installation of a LaTeX distribution and appropriate IDE is completed. (I currently provide the download structure for a USB portable version based on MikTeX and TeXmaker.) After 15 minutes of show and tell, they can do basic math homework found in freshman/...


16

(Disclaimer: I am not visually impaired, nor have I ever taught someone who is to use LaTeX.) Here are the things that I would do: Get on the blindmath mailing list. There are a lot of very knowledgeable and (importantly!) very helpful people there, both visually impaired and sighted, and some have been in the situation you're in. Whilst the focus is ...


16

Word's typesetting algorithm for math is currently better than is TeX's (the situation might change with LuaTeX); the main improvement is in the spacing (factorials are automatically spaced correctly, for example). But that's only part of the picture as, when using Word, you are still stuck with (at least) three main flaws: Word handles the text badly. You ...


15

The math typesetting in Word (post 2007) is closely modelled on TeX. See for example this quote from the person who lead the team responsible for the Math typesetting in Word http://blogs.msdn.com/b/murrays/archive/2006/09/13/752206.aspx The TeXbook is a user manual that includes a detailed specification for mathematical typography. We have used many ...


15

The description in tex.web is clearer. An op_noad is an atom built with \mathop or a mathchar of class 1. It follows that a single character is centered with respect to the math axis, but a “complex” nucleus won't. Note that \mathop{{\delta}} would not work, because the braces around a single character are always removed in math mode; more technically, a ...


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