33

There is a new LaTeX math package called newtx with a libertine option that matches Libertine text, using Libertine Roman italic and Greek together with symbols from the old txfonts package, remetrized so as not to be as cramped, and with optical versions of math italic and symbols. Versions prior to 0.93 were problematic, but 0.93, which should appear ...


32

A late answer (and a shameless plug), but I have been working on math companion to Linux Libertine fonts, which got more attention recently (thanks to support from TUG) and it is starting to take shape. The character coverage is still a bit limited and there may be bugs in the existing ones, but testing and bug reports are appreciated. I’m currently ...


31

A good guide on what factors to consider when mixing fonts is Thierry Bouche's Diversity in math fonts article in TUGboat, Volume 19 (1998), No. 2. The most important aspect is to use the same font for text and math letters (as well as letter-like symbols as \partial or \infty). This has drawbacks as some letters will suffer from spacing problems, but ...


24

The “official” way, is to activate stylistic set 5 feature, StylisticSet=5 fontspec option. If you to use it locally then you can define a “font family” with that option, and if you want it globally you should pass it to \setmainfont. This is also the most portable way, as the glyph name (W.alt) or the private use area code point (U+E02F) can change in the ...


22

It can be scaled using a package option \usepackage[ttscale=.875]{libertine} (you need to play with the value a bit, this is just an initial guess): \documentclass[border=5mm]{standalone} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage[ttscale=.875]{libertine} \begin{document} some text \texttt{monospaced} and normal text \end{document}


21

The Linux Libertine fonts recently switched from libertine-legacy to libertine-type1 in TeX Live. This resulted in many documents not working any more, especially with old-style-figures. Libertine Package Old-style-figures are default in the latest version, so just use: \usepackage{libertine} or \usepackage[oldstyle]{libertine}. The fact that the osf ...


21

Let's walk through all cases: Au{f}lage (or Auf{l}age or Auf{}lage}) (I) This does not break up the ligature at all in luatex, and in fact (contrary to widespread belief) has never reliably done so even in pre-luatex engines (eg. pdftex, tex). Auf"-lage (II) This shortcut from German babel inserts a hyphenation point allowing hyphenation in the ...


21

The height of numbers in some fonts tend to be optimised for appearance in normal text which means that they usually are slightly smaller than the height of the upper case glyphs. This however becomes an issue when these glyphs are surrounded by upper case. Numbers are not the only glyphs that follow that rule, the dash is also on of these glyphs that can ...


18

Use in the document with pdfpages \pdfinclusioncopyfonts=1. (The source of the problem is that two fonts of libertine now have the same internal fontname, and this leads to problems).


17

I created a few preliminary config files for microtype and libertine for usage with pdflatex. They're publicly available from my Bitbucket site. bitbucket.org/cgnieder/microtype-config They're all named mt-<fontname>.cfg and if placed in a suitable place in the local TEXMF tree will be picked up automatically by microtype. This files are far from ...


15

It's not too hard to use it for the variables and constants (letters). For XeLaTeX, you could use the mathspec package. For regular PDFLaTeX, you could use the mathastext package, e.g.: \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage{libertine} \usepackage[italic]{mathastext} That will give you Computer Modern symbols with Libertine letters and numbers. See the ...


15

If you add \typeout{\the\font} \typeout{\the\fontdimen2\font} %space \typeout{\the\fontdimen3\font} %stretch \typeout{\the\fontdimen4\font} % shrink \typeout{\the\fontdimen7\font} % punct after \begin{document} then you will find pdftex \OT1/LinuxLibertineT-TLF/m/n/12 3.0pt 1.5pt 0.99959pt 0.5004pt xetex \TU/LinLibertine(0)/m/n/12 3.0pt 1.5pt 1.0pt ...


14

In LuaLaTeX and XeLaTeX you can specifiy font features with the fontspec package. The Numbers/RawFeature features are Lining and Uppercase/lnum: normal/majuscule figures OldStyle and Lowercase/onum: medieval/minuscule figures Proportional/pnum Monospaced/tnum (t stands for tabular) SlashedZero/zero: gives slashed 0 You can activate these features with ...


14

Inconsolata fits well with Linux Libertine, and has a bold face: \documentclass{scrartcl} \usepackage{fontspec} \usepackage{xunicode} \defaultfontfeatures{Ligatures=TeX} \setmainfont{Linux Libertine O} \setmonofont{Inconsolata} \begin{document} This is a test with \texttt{some \textbf{bold} typewriter text}. \end{document}


13

First, a font does not necessarily support all types of ligatures. Linux Libertine supports only (checked here) Ligatures={Common,Rare,Discretionary}. The OpenType variant of Linux Libertine shipped with media-fonts/libertine-ttf works on an up-to-date Gentoo with TeX Live 2011. Another option is to install the dev-texlive/texlive-fontsextra package, which ...


13

To provide a more current answer to this, there is now Libertinus, a fork of Linux Libertine with bug fixes and pretty nice math support (check out this example document). \documentclass[varwidth,border=1mm]{standalone} \usepackage[ math-style=ISO, bold-style=ISO, partial=upright, nabla=upright ]{unicode-math} \setmainfont{Libertinus Serif}...


13

In the MWE below, a pangram is first in text italics (with Linux Libertine) and then in four different math alphabets -- Asana Math, Cambria Math (not entirely free, but quite cheap), XITS Math, and Latin Modern Math. The exercise is repeated with Linux Biolinum and the same four math alphabets, this time in sans-serif mode. I'd say that the overall closest,...


12

If XeLaTeX is the only format that satisfies your typesetting needs -- in particular, if you can't use LuaLaTeX -- you have two options for suppressing the tt ligature while not also turning off all "common" ligatures entirely: Insert what TeX calls an implicit kern (of zero width) between the two t characters: rot\kern0pt ten % note: no space between "\...


12

There is no simple answer to this. Or, rather, you already know the simple answer. In general, I would recommend \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} unless you know you need something different. In general, this will give good results which will be better than the alternatives in most cases. This is because the T1 encoding will get you everything the default OT1 ...


11

Well libertineotf declares which font to use for bold: \setmainfont[Extension=.otf, BoldFont=LinLibertine_RB, .... And this can be a different font to the one found if you use only \setmainfont. You can add \XeTeXtracingfonts= 1 to your document to get some more informations in the log-file. And you can compile with xelatex --output-...


11

The OT1 encoding has no slot for the braces, because the normally allocated ones are for different symbols (the en-dash and the closing double quotes respectively). Instead, the braces are in a T1 encoded font. Jump to the end for a short summary; otherwise, read on. TeXnical details When the encoding is OT1, \{ and \} choose a different font. Let's see; ...


11

If you just want to disable the tt ligature without disabling the others and don't want to manually add a kern each time, you can use the xetex charclass mechanism. I don't seem to have the font so I disabled ff in arial instead, also I inserted a 10pt kern rather than 0pt, to make it more obvious. Note in the second line ff is separated but the fi ...


11

This is perhaps one of the cases where the new primitive \pdfinterwordspaceon can be useful. If I run \documentclass{article} \pdfinterwordspaceon \usepackage{libertine} \usepackage{lipsum} \setlipsumdefault{1} \begin{document} \lipsum \end{document} and save to text from Adobe Reader, the spaces show.


11

It's a bug in the Type1 version of the Biolinum font; the Type1 font used by the combination slanted/boldface is LinBiolinumTBO.pfb and this is what fontforge shows for the character “L” where the corner is quite evident. The same character in the OpenType font Important update Bob Tennent has submitted an updated version of the fonts on CTAN. After ...


10

It is generally a bad idea to access alternate glyphs using private use area code points, instead you should use the appropriate OpenType features, in this case the alternate ampersand can be activated with Alternate=1 font option, now using a simplified \amper definition: \newfontfamily\amperfont[Alternate=1]{Linux Libertine O} \makeatletter \...


10

This a bug in XeTeX resulting from mixing the OpenType (AKA "native") font Libertine with accent from the TFM font newtxmath. It didn't show up in earlier versions because of a bug that prevented the proper utilisation of OpenType math accent positioning that has been recently fixed. I tried to fix the new bug, but it seems to be a bit tricky. Anyway, I ...


10

This seems to be bug in the libertine fonts. When you use newtxmath it will set the operator font (the one used for small parentheses) to the roman font (libertine). For some reason the font will use the operator font for large opening parentheses too instead of the correct large symbols font. The handling of closing parentheses is correct The problem ...


10

This has nothing to do with siunitx: it's the font used for numbers in math mode that's wrong. You can solve the issue with this block of font settings: \usepackage[libertine]{newtxmath} \usepackage[no-math]{fontspec} \setmainfont{Linux Libertine O} %%% Uncomment the following line, if something is still wrong % \DeclareSymbolFont{operators}{OT1}{...


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