2

A solution with elementary tools: \documentclass[11pt]{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{array} \setlength{\extrarowheight}{2pt} \usepackage{makecell} \newcommand*{\myhline}{\hline \noalign{\vskip 1ex} \hline} \begin{document} \bgroup\setlength{\arraycolsep}{2pt} \begin{alignat*}{3} \setcellgapes{4pt}\...


2

Drawn as tikzpicture, using matric and positioning` libraries: \documentclass[tikz, margin=3mm]{standalone} \usetikzlibrary{matrix, positioning} \tikzset{mymatrix/.style = {matrix of math nodes, nodes={draw, minimum width=2em, minimum height=3ex, inner sep=0pt, outer sep=0pt, ...


2

With the standard article class, with no option, the text width is set to 345pt. On the other hand, your longest equations are 195.14384pt and 205.44582pt wide respectively. This makes for slightly more than 400pt, so there's no chance to set the two blocks side by side unless you increase the text width; in order to ensure space for the mid rule, along ...


1

Unless the text block of your document is considerably wider than the default for the article document class, you will need line-break the first fraction term. in both minipage environments. Note the use of \noindent before the first \begin{minipage} statement: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} \...


1

Your equations hardly fit between the margins when loading geometry. Other than that, I propose to use a single align* environment, with three columns, the middle column being dedicated to the vertical line. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage[showframe]{geometry} \begin{document} \begin{align*} \frac{\mathrm{d} R1(t)}{\mathrm{...


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