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The TeX Gyre Fonts Latin Modern This is the default font family loaded by unicode-math, but can also be set up explicitly. It is an OpenType version of Latin Modern, a clone of DEK’s Computer Modern, based on Monotype Modern, and of the AMS symbol fonts. The default fonts are therefore nearly identical to those of classic LaTeX. This conversion is the ...


27

that's called »optical sizes« or »grades«. A typeface designer may choose to draw several versions of a typeface, each optimized for printing at a certain size. For example, a grade optimized for printing at footnote size (say, 8pt) will usually have sturdier hairlines, less stroke contrast, maybe a bit looser spacing, maybe a decreased ascender-to-xheight ...


26

Here is a non-fancytooltips solution that supports any driver, including xelatex, allowing you to use OpenType and TrueType fonts. It makes use of the macro \tooltip[<link text colour>]{<link text>}[<tip box colour>]{<tip text>} for generating draggable boxes in the PDF display of AdobeReader. The macro for creating an inline ...


22

The situation with fonts is much better than you thought! I absolutely agree with your advisor that you should use OpenType fonts (and therefore, the unicode-math package on either XeLaTeX or LuaLaTeX). Any OpenType math font will have more-complete and consistent symbol coverage than any combination of legacy LaTeX packages, but the package also allows ...


21

Some thing like this using feature files should work: First the feature file: # scripts and languages, if the font use others they should be defined here too languagesystem DFLT dflt; languagesystem latn dflt; # this undoes the effect of rare ligature on ft feature liga { sub f_t.alt by f t; } liga; # move rare ft to historic ligatures feature hlig { ...


20

Ok, I try to give as many answers as possible: Decide if you need it and can use it As you already know, ArXiv does not accept pdfs created from latex code. So you are out here if you use commercial fonts. Of course you can decide the following: print your articles with the commercial fonts submit the same article with a public fonts to arxiv distribute ...


18

LuaTeX has the same font support as pdfTeX, natively. However, using the right Lua code one can extend the font support, which is precisely the job of luaotfload.lua. The luaotfload.sty file can be loaded also with the Plain LuaTeX format. Try compiling the following file with luatex (note that "Linux Libertine O" is in my system fonts, I used it just by ...


16

Let me add to the confusion a bit: there are actually two formats for running Plain with LuaTeX! One of them is the format that gets called when you run the command luatex from e.g. TeX Live; egreg already posted instructions for it in his answer. There exists, however, another format called luatex-plain. Since it comes with the font loader built in, it has ...


15

With XeTeX you can get glyph by name, but I don't think it's possible to map the name to the Unicode point, which wouldn't make sense anyway, because a code point can correspond to several glyphs. Here's how: if you know the name, say zero.slash, you can print the glyph with \XeTeXglyph\XeTeXglyphindex"zero.slash"<space> I got the list of glyph ...


15

For OpenType fonts, you simply take the name you use when loading the font, in your case Adobe Garamond Pro. You could then use the file mt-pad.cfg as your template, by copying it to mt-AdobeGaramondPro.cfg (note, no spaces), and changing/adding the protrusion values: \SetProtrusion [ name = AdobeGaramondPro ] { encoding = {EU1,EU2}, % EU1 = xetex,...


14

I really have to apologise for the long delay on this answer. As you discovered this was an unintentional change made while a lot of the package was being re-implemented. I've spent some time today looking into how this could be resolved; I'm not really sure what the best option is, so I've reverted the package to the old behaviour (not the old code, though ...


14

You can use fontspec function \fontspec_if_feature:nTF. It will work in both xelatex and lualatex \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec,etoolbox,expl3} \setmainfont{Cambria} \def\fontfeatures{abvf, abvm, abvs, aalt, akhn, nalt, halt, afrc, valt, vhal, blwf, blwm, blws, cpsp, c2pc, c2sc, case, cpct, cv01, cv02, cv03, cv04, cv05, cv06, cv07, cv08, cv09,...


14

Unlike most word processors, LaTeX does, in general, not simply scale a font to the requested size, but uses designed fonts for particular sizes. This is specified in the fd files. If you look at the pslatex times package fd files for Times Roman you see: \DeclareFontShape{T1}{ptm}{m}{n}{ <-> ptmr8t }{} Which says that in T1 encoding for Times ...


14

The following example defines poor man's versions of a zero with dot (\pmzerodot) and slash (\pmzeroslash). Remarks for \pmzerodot: \cdot is used as the dot. Normally it is placed on the math axis that does not have to be the vertical middle of the digit zero. Therefore the height of the digit is measured and the dot is placed in the middle. For slanted ...


13

Incidentally I was thinking about less invasive solution last night and it occurred to me using LuaTeX's catcode tables might help. The code below will reset catcodes to the "standard" LaTeX catcode table (whatever that means) inside math mode, I don't know what side effects this might have (hopefully none). \documentclass{article} \usepackage{unicode-math} ...


13

The basic difference between TrueType and Type1 fonts is that the former use quadratic splines, while the latter use cubic Bézier curves. OpenType is a wrapper format that can contain both Type1 and TrueType fonts, which also defines many other features of which the original formats are incapable. So an OpenType font can be one or the other; it's customary ...


13

Here's my attempt to answer your question and the summary is: don't do it. Here are the datails: Installation I've been attempting the same as you did: Converting OTF fonts to use with pdfLaTeX. As mentioned in the comments, the way to go forward is to use the otfinst script. The website gives details and provides a script specifically for Adobe Garamond ...


12

The question ends with: Or is it simply that when placing the superscript y then MSWord chooses to place the bottom of the y at the superscript baseline instead of the baseline of the y? I think this analysis spot on. The Open Type Math Table documented algorithm is identical to TeX's algorithm in this case. There are a few other mathematical ...


12

This should list all features in the current font, it can even be extended to list supported scripts and languages for every feature: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \begin{document} \newcommand\listfontfeatures{% \directlua{ local id = font.current() local font = fonts.identifiers[id] local data = font.shared.otfdata if data then local ...


12

This is the consequence of a bad decision in unicode-math: they named \mathit the normal math italic letters, instead of respecting the LaTeX convention of referring to them as \mathnormal; \mathit should choose the text italic font, in order to make unicode-math a drop-in replacement. I wouldn't expect different output when unicode-math is loaded or not; ...


12

As you seem to want to adjust the spacing only if more numbers are involved, you could change the kernings between two numbers: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \defaultfontfeatures{Ligatures=TeX} \directlua { fonts.handlers.otf.addfeature { name = "ktest", type = "kern", data = { ["1"] = { ...


11

Aside from ConTeXt, it is also possible to include OpenType fonts in MetaPost labels if you use MetaPost through Lua(La)TeX. As it was noted in the comments, thanks to Dohyun Kim the btex … etex flags are now recognized by luamplib, but in the recents versions it goes much further than that: luamplib now also includes a textext function that is pretty much ...


11

The answer assumes you're using XeLaTeX or LuaLaTeX. The definition of \@maketitle in the article class is \def\@maketitle{% \newpage \null \vskip 2em% \begin{center}% \let \footnote \thanks {\LARGE \@title \par}% \vskip 1.5em% {\large \lineskip .5em% \begin{tabular}[t]{c}% \@author \end{tabular}\par}% \...


11

The method for accessing a specific glyph using fontspec depends on the engine used. With XeTeX, an implementation is \XeTeXglyph554\relax (Thanks egreg). An example document, using the inaccessible glyph with ID 554 from Stevens Titling Pro, Sable Brush, is shown below: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \setmainfont{StevensTitlPro-SableBrush....


11

With kind help from @cfr, you've established that: The font does contain ligature glyphs. fontspec can't make use of AAT ligature information even if it's available. The font omits OpenType feature data necessary for automatic ligature support. So what can you do? You can either add the missing mapping data to the font, or create an external OpenType ...


11

The code below using Arial rather than Helvetica produces the above. The OP confirms that the code worked with teh Helvetica variant in the original question if if(string.find(name,'HelveticaNeueLTStd'), is used in place of if(string.find(name,'arial') If you switch \iffalse to \iftrue to use the modified font loader then you get the output below in ...


10

There’s DTL OTMaster, which can be used for free for inspecting a font (and for a fee, for font editing, too). It takes a little time to find out all the functions in the program, but e.g. the alternate glyphs available in a font can be found out by selecting Tools > 'GPOS'/'GSUB' Table Viewer and then 'GSUB' table from the first dropdown (Layout Table), ...


10

Without knowing your operating system or anything else about your set-up, I can’t say why you’re having trouble installing coloredlettrine. But if you’re compiling with xetex or luatex, you don’t need to install the fonts in TEXMFHOME (that’s a big advantage of xetex and luatex), and you can do for yourself what coloredlettrine does. Just install the fonts ...


10

This is possible with a contextual feature. The class @greekletter defines all Greek letters (the example still needs to be completed), then a beta after a Greek letter is replaced by its slim form: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec,filecontents} \begin{filecontents*}{junicode.fea} languagesystem DFLT dflt; languagesystem latn dflt; # The list ...


10

Fira Math: sans-serif font with Unicode math support Developed by Xiangdong Zeng (Stone-Zeng) at https://github.com/Stone-Zeng/FiraMath


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