New answers tagged

0

The solution is to use: \include{calc} \def\svgscale{.4}{\input{SeriesCase4.pdf_tex}} This has also been added to the overleaf link. This came from here: http://ctan.net/info/svg-inkscape/InkscapePDFLaTeX.tex


0

I guess the easiest way to align the plots vertically is to simply make use of the groupplots library. (Please note that there currently seems to be a bug when symbolic coords are used in a groupplot. That is why I needed to use a different approach to provide the data. And because I anyway was "forced" to restate the data I also switched them from ...


0

This solution is an improvement of Jonathan's answer. It's easy to use by calling the option Sloped instead of sloped. transform shape is supported. \documentclass[tikz]{standalone} \usepackage{tikz} \makeatletter \tikzset{ Sloped/.code = { \iftikz@fullytransformed% tikz.code.tex \tikzset{sloped} \else \pgfgettransformentries{\mya}{\myb}{\myc}{\myd}...


1

I prefer \smash[b]: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{mathtools} \begin{document} Here could be text. \[ \left(2,\smash[b]{\underbrace{\frac{5}{3}}_{\mathclap{\approx 1.66666667}}} \right) \vphantom{\underbrace{\frac{5}{3}}_{\approx 1.66666667}} \] Here could be more text. \end{document} because it would also work together with \...


6

Instead of shrinking the font size, it is generally better to use a line break. For that purpose the amsmath package provides the multline environment. From the documentation: The multline environment is a variation of the equation environment used for equations that don't fit on a single line. The first line of a multline will be at the left margin ...


Top 50 recent answers are included