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6

Here is a proof of concept using LuaXML for SVG parsing and Flowfram for flow frames. I've created a package svgflowfram.sty: \ProvidesPackage{svgflowfram} \RequirePackage{flowfram} \RequirePackage{xparse} \RequirePackage{luacode} \begin{luacode*} local load_frames = require "svgframes" function print_frame(x,y, width, height) tex.print(string.format("\\...


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If you don't want to use the same font as the main document, you should just export the SVG file directly as a PDF (without the --export-latex option) and \includegraphics the PDF file. (The linked answer in your original question is specifically about how to export the graphics part into a PDF file and the text part separately into a TeX file that can be ...


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I would've added this as a comment but my reputation is too low to comment: What I end up doing on such occasians is one of the following things: Use an image editor to manually remove any unwanted whitespace before including the svg in LateX (e.g. Inkscape). Even if you think there is none take a look and verify it. Use an online alternative for cleaning ...


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The FAQ of dvisvgm mentions the following: The generated SVG is most likely valid but your SVG viewer/editor probably doesn’t support embedded fonts. Actually, only few SVG renderers, e.g. Apache Batik and the Opera web browser evaluate embedded fonts properly (also see the screenshots). You can run dvisvgm with option --no-fonts to replace the ...


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By default, Gnuplot is in enhanced mode, which means that strings are checked for formatting characters. You can for example use set label "x^{2+3}" at 1,3" resulting in a superscript (dy="-6.00px"): <tspan font-family="Arial" >x</tspan> <tspan font-family="Arial" font-size="9.6" dy="-6.00px">2+3</tspan> However, if you want to use ...


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This helped me a lot when I encountered a lot of error messages for a simple figure even though other figures that I implemented the same way hadn't given any problems compiling. @David Carlisle's fix definitely works, however, it was more obvious (and maybe even easier) for me to just change the "%" in the picture itself (meaning in the Inkscape-Window, ...


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