New answers tagged

1

I add some proposals.... \documentclass[11pt]{article} \usepackage{newtxtext} \usepackage{newtxmath} \usepackage{MnSymbol} \usepackage{wasysym} \begin{document} \( f \star g \), \verb|classic star| \( f \mathbin{\filledstar} g \), \verb|MnSymbol package| $f \mathrel{\thinstar} g $, \verb|MnSymbol package| $f \mathbin{\APLstar} g $, \verb|Table 330: ...


1

You could borrow the \star from Latin Modern. \documentclass[11pt]{article} \usepackage{newtxtext} \usepackage{newtxmath} \DeclareSymbolFont{LMletters}{OML}{lmm}{m}{it} \DeclareMathSymbol{\lmstar}{\mathbin}{LMletters}{63} \begin{document} \( f \star g \) \( f \lmstar g \) \end{document}


2

For example using mathrsfs package give to you the symbol O: \documentclass[12pt]{article} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \begin{document} $\mathscr{O}$ \end{document}


1

I confronted a similar problem with a need for a pretty bar over various characters with \mathbf, \mathcal, \mathfrak, etc. By "pretty," I mean that the bar seems very appropriate to the character shape and size, and this means adjusting the length and placement (left and right offsets) until it looks right. Further, the commands used must be ...


3

This is more of a comment, but requires an example. The problem described does not occur with Computer Modern, and the reason is the difference in the metrics in the .tfm file: the "d" in the alphabet used for math does not have an italic correction. This is by design, since "d" is most often used by Knuth for the differential operator; ...


0

I tried several of those options all leading to a small square instead of «». This did the trick for me. \documentclass{article} \usepackage[francais]{babel} % guillemets \og text \fg{} \usepackage{aeguill} % guillemets \begin{document} \og text \fg{} \end{document}


0

The above link to the «Short Math Guide for LaTeX» by the AMS seems to be broken. Correct link is: http://tug.ctan.org/info/short-math-guide/short-math-guide.pdf (As answer as I cannot comment)


2

\XeTeXglyphindex "ass_completa_CONT" \relax should expand to the integer glyphid then \XeTeXglyph ⟨glyph slot⟩ should typeset it, so \XeTeXglyph \XeTeXglyphindex "ass_completa_CONT" \relax Probably works...


7

The beamer class loads, by default, both amsmath and amssymb (unless these are explicitly disabled with the relevant class options). The \square and \Box command are indeed provided by amssymb and loading this package would suffice for using them; however, if a document uses those symbols it is likely about mathematics and so amsmath is recommended as well. ...


2

To add to @domperor's answer, for symbols in text mode, the \usefont command can be used. MWE \documentclass{article} \DeclareFontFamily{U}{FdSymbolA}{} \DeclareFontShape{U}{FdSymbolA}{m}{n}{<->FdSymbolA-Book}{} \newcommand\vardiamondsuit{{\usefont{U}{FdSymbolA}{m}{n}\char182}} \newcommand\varheartsuit{{\usefont{U}{FdSymbolA}{m}{n}\char184}} \begin{...


0

In the recent version 1.18 of newtxmath there are new math accents and macros. The macro \widering, as written into the guide, places a ring centered over an \overgroup, not dissimilar from its use in yhmath. But for my tastes the command \widering given by newtxmath have a better arc: \documentclass[a4paper,12pt]{article} \usepackage{newtxmath,newtxtext} \...


6

This is a short working example: \documentclass{article} \DeclareFontFamily{U}{FdSymbolA}{} \DeclareFontShape{U}{FdSymbolA}{m}{n}{<->FdSymbolA-Book}{} \DeclareSymbolFont{extrasymbols}{U}{FdSymbolA}{m}{n} \DeclareMathSymbol{\vardiamondsuit}{\mathord}{extrasymbols}{182} \DeclareMathSymbol{\varheartsuit}{\mathord}{extrasymbols}{184} \begin{document} $\...


12

This happens when you use the T1 encoding. You can disable the ligature that maps >> to » with microtype. I also removed the ligature from << to « for symmetry. The first line shows that the ligatures are not suppressed altogether, but only when using the monospaced font. \documentclass{article} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage{courier} \...


14

The addition of a group around the central > will prevent each from seeing the others, and therefore should prevent (for lack of a better word) the ligature from forming. Note: See comments to this answer, which are very illuminating, which explains why this technique will work in pdflatex but not lualatex! \documentclass{article} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} ...


1

From the log sniplet you posted we can see that you're using MikTeX. To keep sizes down, sadly, MikTeX use a metafont font as the default font. This font is not scalable, and thus at high resolution you see pixelations like you show here You have two choices install the cm-super package, this installs a vector version of the default font. It is also the ...


5

I have changed the initial code completely: there are the combination of two particular packages: accents and scalerel. With these packages I have created a macro called \arcsup with the arc only above the character . If you want to have a large horizontal arc you can increase the value of \hstretch{1.8} to stretch horizzontally the arc. \documentclass[...


2

Not exactly the answer to your question, but the package yhmath have the \widering command which can be useful to you: \documentclass[twoside]{article} \usepackage{fancyhdr} \usepackage{nameref} \usepackage{abraces} \usepackage{amsfonts,amsmath, amssymb, mathtools} \usepackage{yhmath} \makeatletter \newcommand*{\currentname}{\@currentlabelname} \makeatother ...


5

Perhaps with the use of stacks. The current \circ elevation is controlled by the -2pt optional argument to \stackon. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{abraces} \usepackage{amsfonts,amsmath, amssymb, mathtools} \usepackage{stackengine} \stackMath \begin{document} \[\left((\overline{M})_{\tau_1}\right)^\mathsf{c} = (\stackon[-2pt]{\aoverbrace[L1R] {M^\...


1

The comments are perfect! But if a day you would to use two accents my suggestion is to adopt accents package. Here a MWE with a screenshot. \documentclass[12pt]{article} \usepackage{accents} \begin{document} $\hat{A}_{12}$, $\hat{\accentset{\circ}{A}}_{12}$, $\hat{\accentset{\diamond}{A}}_{12}$ \end{document}


12

Using the \multimap symbol...rotated using also scalerel package. \documentclass[12pt]{article} \usepackage{amsmath,amssymb} \usepackage{graphicx} \newcommand{\circmap}{\raisebox{.7\depth}{$\rotmap$}} \newcommand{\rotmap}{\rotatebox[origin=c]{-90}{$\multimap$}} \usepackage{scalerel} \usepackage{parskip} \begin{document} Euler's formula is remarkable: $e^{i\...


13

As @Noone pointed out, there is a similar unicode character (U+2AF0). As for most unicode characters, it is included in the STIX font. It can be accessed without loading the whole font as in the following example. \documentclass{article} \DeclareFontEncoding{LS1}{}{} \DeclareFontSubstitution{LS1}{stix}{m}{n} \DeclareSymbolFont{symbols4}{LS1}{stixbb}{m}{it} \...


1

Had the same issue, but wanted the uncertainties to not extend outside the original text height too much. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} $1.06${\raisebox{0.5ex}{\tiny$\substack{+0.04 \\ -0.05}$}} or $1.06${\raisebox{0.5ex}{\tiny$^{+0.04}_{-0.05}$} as opposed to $1.06^{+0.04}_{-0.05}$ \end{document} Turned out to ...


15

Is this what you want? \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath,pict2e} \makeatletter \newcommand{\disjoint}{}% for safety \DeclareRobustCommand{\disjoint}{% \mathrel{% \mathpalette\disjoint@\relax }% } \newcommand{\disjoint@}[2]{% \begingroup \setlength{\unitlength}{\disjoint@height{#1}}% \begin{picture}(1.4,2) \roundcap \...


5

I sometimes use Euler or Computer Modern Upright Italic for upright math symbols distinct from operators. Usually, though, that’s been constants in ISO style. Other available math alphabets include \mathsf, \mathtt, \mathcal and \mathfrak. Examples Here is a sample that defines a new symbol \dimension, as the letter d in Computer Modern Upright Italic: \...


2

The features of scalerel can accomplish this. \documentclass[12pt]{article}%, border=2pt]{standalone} \usepackage{MnSymbol} \usepackage{sansmath} \usepackage{stackengine, amsfonts,scalerel} % \newcommand{\leftharpoontriangleX}{\mathord{\ensurestackMath{% \stackinset{c}{0pt}{c}{-0.3ex}{\scriptstyle\leftharpoonup}% {\largetriangleup}}}} \newcommand{\...


3

A bit of a fusion of the previous two answers, which declares either Unicode characters for use with PDFLaTeX or tipa-compatible commands for use with LuaLaTeX or XeLaTeX: \documentclass{article} \tracinglostchars=2 \usepackage{iftex} \pagestyle{empty} % format this MWE for TeX.SX \usepackage[paperwidth=10cm]{geometry} \iftutex \usepackage{fontspec} \...


13

See Sergio's answer if you can use a modern Unicode engine like LuaLaTeX (or XeLaTeX). If you want to access the symbol in pdfLaTeX, it helps to know that this is an obsolete IPA symbol, so you can use the tipa package: It provides the symbol as \textctt (standing for text curly tail t): \documentclass{article} \usepackage[safe]{tipa} \begin{document} \...


4

It is the Unicode Character 'LATIN SMALL LETTER T WITH CURL' (U+0236), see https://www.fileformat.info/info/unicode/char/0236/index.htm If you use XeLaTeX and STIX Two fonts (see https://ctan.mirror.garr.it/mirrors/CTAN/fonts/stix2-otf/StixTwoMath.pdf, page 8), you can get that character by inserting the unicode code/name in the way your editor accepts it. ...


1

Use mathematical kerns, that automatically adapt to the style. \documentclass{article} \DeclareRobustCommand{\AAA}{A\mkern-5mu A} \begin{document} \[ \AAA\frac{\AAA}{AA}\textstyle\frac{\AAA}{AA}\scriptstyle\frac{\AAA}{AA} \] \end{document}


3

Set it up to account for the math style. \documentclass{article} \newcommand\dblA{\mathchoice {A\hspace{-.7ex}A} {A\hspace{-.7ex}A} {A\hspace{-.58ex}A} {A\hspace{-.55ex}A}% } \begin{document} $\dblA AA$ $\scriptstyle\dblA AA$ $\scriptscriptstyle\dblA AA$ \end{document}


0

After some searching I found a suitable answer. It is not exactly what I was hoping for in terms of a master list but I am happy with the results I have for now, so I am posting this answer for anyone that has the same problems. I made use of the standalone package along with the nomenclpackage. I added the following to my preamble: \usepackage{standalone} \...


2

What I frequently do when I encounter pesky invisible characters in an equation is to (a) switch from pdfLaTeX to LuaLaTeX and (b) make sure to load the unicode-math package. That way, invisible characters such as U+2061 (FUNCTION APPLICATION) show up in the pdf file -- see the first line in the screenshot below. This makes it straightforward to locate and ...


6

It is included in the STIX font. It can be imported without importing the whole font as in the following example. \documentclass{article} \DeclareFontEncoding{LS1}{}{} \DeclareFontSubstitution{LS1}{stix}{m}{n} \DeclareSymbolFont{symbols}{LS1}{stixscr}{m}{n} \DeclareMathSymbol{\blackinwhitesquare}{\mathord}{symbols}{"BA} \begin{document} \( \...


7

This is ▣ (U+25A3} in Unicode, and you can use it in fontspec. Examples \documentclass{article} \usepackage{unicode-math} \setmathfont{STIX Two Math} \begin{document} \( \blackinwhitesquare \) \end{document} The XITS Math and STIX Two Math fonts have this symbol. You can import only this symbol while using another math font. \setmathfont{Latin Modern Math}...


8

Same size as \square. Works across math styles. The .5 scale of the inner box can be adjusted to suit. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amssymb,stackengine,graphicx,scalerel} \newcommand\dsquare{\ThisStyle{\ensurestackMath{% \stackinset{c}{}{c}{}{\scalebox{.5}{$\SavedStyle\blacksquare$}} {\SavedStyle\square}}}} \begin{document} $\square\blacksquare \...


2

Fits within the existing size of \square. Let the bowling commence! \documentclass{article} \usepackage{scalerel,amssymb,stackengine} \DeclareRobustCommand\boxdiag{\boxslsh{1}} \DeclareRobustCommand\boxbslash{\boxslsh{-1}} \newcommand\boxslsh[1]{ \mathchoice{ \ensurestackMath{\stackengine{0pt}{\square} {\stretchrel*[80]{\hstretch{#1}{/}}{\square}}{O}{c}{...


2

Definitely not perfect, but it was fun to play with pict2e again. The scaling does not work well in all math styles because \square sticks out of its box by the same amount in all math styles. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath,amssymb,pict2e} \makeatletter \DeclareRobustCommand{\boxdiagup}{{\m@th\mathpalette\@boxdiagup\relax}} \newcommand*{\@...


4

Just I add only the symbol \Game from the Table 204: 𝒜ℳ𝒮 Letter-like Symbols of the Comprensive list symbols: \documentclass[12pt]{article} \usepackage{amsmath,amssymb} \begin{document} \[\Game^a_b\] \end{document}


0

Another idea is to use the fontsawesome5 package with \faRProject.


3

By chance, I noticed that I already have the package graphicx loaded (without clashes), which means I can rotate a symbol. Thus the gruesome \rotatebox[origin=c]{90}{$\mathrlap{\smallsetminus}\square$} (which of course I meanwhile macro-ed with \newcommand) does the trick without any side effects, and looks nearly as perfect as the native box-with-diagonal ...


3

I would combine the \substack{...} macro of the amsmath package and the \smashoperator[r]{...} macro of the mathtools package. The \substack macro permits introducing line breaks in the argument of "large" operators (such as \bigcup). The \smashoperator[r] macro permits joining up the operator to the material to its right. \documentclass{article} \...


1

In the modern toolchain, with unicode-math, you can substitute this glyph from a different font. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{unicode-math} \setmainfont{TeX Gyre Termes} \setmathfont{TeX Gyre Termes Math} \setmathfont{XITS Math}[range=\mitlambda,Scale=MatchLowercase] \pagestyle{empty} \begin{document} \[ \lambda \] \end{document}


0

This is the solution to insert musical rhythms in a text: \documentclass{tufte-book} \usepackage{musicography} \begin{document} the package musicography allows the insertion of rhythms cells as the following example \musSixteenth\ \musCorchea \musCorchea\ \musQuarter\ . \end{document} The result is as follows:


7

The unicode-math package includes all the math symbols in Unicode, under the same names as stix and stix2. You can import them with \setmathfont[ range={\hexagonblack,\varhexagonblack}, Scale=MatchUppercase ]{STIX Two Math} XITS Math is a fork of the STIX 1 font, and other fonts might or might not have these symbols.


13

Just it is a bit complex but I had used thus how I have written in the image a combination between tikz and \usetikzlibrary{shapes} that get the hexagon symbol: regular polygon sides=6. After I have used \mathord like suggested by user @Thruston in the recent comment. \documentclass[a4paper,12pt]{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{...


7

The symbols in marvosym are meant to be used in text. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{marvosym} \begin{document} Wrong: \verb|$a=\HexaSteel$| $\to$ $a=\HexaSteel$ Right: \verb|$a=\text{\HexaSteel}$| $\to$ $a=\text{\HexaSteel}$ \end{document} Of course, if you plan to use this as a math symbol, you can do \newcommand{\hexagon}{\...


15

As for most unicode symbols, there are filled hexagons in the STIX font. They can be imported without importing the whole font. \documentclass{article} \DeclareFontEncoding{LS1}{}{} \DeclareFontSubstitution{LS1}{stix}{m}{n} \DeclareSymbolFont{symbols4}{LS1}{stixbb}{m}{it} \DeclareMathSymbol{\varhexagonblack}{\mathord}{symbols4}{"DD} \DeclareMathSymbol{\...


9

The STIX font also has two versions of the symbol (in different rotations). For pdfLaTeX you can use the stix2 package. Downside is that STIX becomes the font for your entire document. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{stix2} \begin{document} \(a+b=\varhexagonblack\). \(b+a=\hexagonblack\). \end{document}


8

You can print this symbol without any package from the font MarVoSym.ttf: \font\marvosym=umvs {\marvosym\char146}


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