New answers tagged

1

There is a very simple way to do that: using "gregorio" in LualaTex: % !TEX TS-program = lualatex \documentclass{article} \usepackage[bitstream-charter]{mathdesign}%I like this font, but you can use another font. \usepackage{gregoriotex} \begin{document} \Vbar \Rbar \end{document}


1

For the question of typing: The Vedic accents are not available on the standard keyboard layouts, it seems. Which leaves: (a) direct input individual selection of characters from a character map (e.g., BabelMap); (b) almost-direct input via text editors where the unicode value can be keyed in and pressing Alt-X converts it to the glyph (e.g., LibreOffice ...


2

You can use the cmtex10 font: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{newunicodechar} \DeclareFontFamily{OT1}{cmtex}{} \DeclareFontShape{OT1}{cmtex}{m}{n}{<-> cmtex10}{} \DeclareTextFontCommand{\textttex}{\usefont{OT1}{cmtex}{m}{n}} \newunicodechar{≤}{\ifmmode\le\else\textttex{\symbol{"1C}}\fi} \newunicodechar{≥}{\ifmmode\ge\else\textttex{\symbol{"1D}}\...


0

I’ll repost my answer using Unicode. It’s not as terse as requested, because it uses expl3, but neither is David Carslisle’s fine answer. Here is a solution using fontspec and expl3. It’s not very compact, but in my opinion, it’s a lot more readable than the legacy solution. \documentclass{article} \RequirePackage{expl3} \usepackage{fontspec} % These ...


0

If you're feeling hacky, or are working on an online platform based on KaTeX, this is a mediocre, but perhaps passable ASCII-inspired solution: \underline{/\overline{ \vphantom{/} \hphantom{a}}\,}\!\overline{/}} Hopefully you don't need to use this, though :)


0

Here is how you can define custom commands using special characters for the \stackrel approach. \catcode`\!=11 \newcommand{\eq!}{\stackrel{?}{=}} % ... $f(x) \eq! 4$ It is also nice to define \leq?, \mid? etc. This solution is significantly better than writing \stackrel{?}{=} and friends frequently.


10

In the Computer Modern math font family, the shapes of \setminus and \backslash are identical. (Aside: the vertical size of \backslash can be modified by \left and \right directives; that's not the case for \setminus.) That does not mean, though, that the symbols get typeset identically. This is because \backslash has status mathord ("math ordinary"), ...


13

by default \setminus is \DeclareMathSymbol{\setminus}{\mathbin}{symbols}{"6E} That is a smallish \, set as a binary operator with the same spacing as - but \backslash is \DeclareMathDelimiter{\backslash}{\mathord}{symbols}{"6E}{largesymbols}{"0F} That is a large \ that can grow with \left right but otherwise set as an ordinary symbol, so acting like | ...


6

This is a letter invented by Dr. Seuss for his children's book On Beyond Zebra! The author presents several letters which extend the known 26-letter alphabet of English. In the book the letter is not assigned a name, but some call it ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ. See en.wikipedia.org/wiki/On_Beyond_Zebra! and the link to the registered Unicode extension on ...


7

I had to guess some of the unicode mappings, just looking at https://www.unicode.org/charts/PDF/U13000.pdf \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \newfontfamily\hg{Segoe UI Historic} \def\hgunits#1{\ifcase#1\relax\or ^^^^^^0133fa\or ^^^^^^0133fb\or ^^^^^^0133fc\or ^^^^^^0133fd\or ^^^^^^0133fe\or ^^^^^^0133ff\or ^^^^^^013400\or ^^^^^^013401\or ^^^^^^...


11

See, if this work for you: \documentclass{standalone} \usepackage{tikz} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture}[line width=5pt] \foreach \i in {0, 90, 180, 270} \draw[rotate=\i] (0,0) -- ++ (45:1) arc (45:90:1); \end{tikzpicture} \end{document}


2

Just remove \usepackage{lmodern} and \usepackage[T1]{fontenc}. \documentclass[9pt]{beamer} \mode<presentation> { \usetheme{JuanLesPins} \usefonttheme{serif} \usecolortheme{beaver} \setbeamercovered{invisible} \setbeamertemplate{blocks}[rounded][shadow=true] \setbeamertemplate{navigation symbols}{} \setbeamertemplate{footline}[...


1

It very much looks like the issue you've come across is a (bad) side-effect of using the polyglossia package, which seems to have a few issues when used with the brazil language option. Unless you absolutely must use the polyglossia package, an easy remedy consists of (a) getting rid of (or, at least, commenting out) the instructions \usepackage{...


1

The test file \documentclass{article} \usepackage{catchfilebetweentags} \begin{document} \ExecuteMetaData ∗ [filename]{tag} \end{document} produces the error shown ! Argument of \UTFviii@three@octets has an extra }. <inserted text> \par l.6 \ExecuteMetaData � �� [filename]{tag} ? as the LaTex *form of a ...


4

The solution to the problem is to load the letltxmacro package and do: \LetLtxMacro\iso\cong \LetLtxMacro\cong\equiv A little explanation: your reasoning that "TeX read commands from top to bottom" is correct. After you do \newcommand{\iso}{\cong}, the command \iso will make a ≅ as you expect, but not how you expect it to. After the \newcommand above (...


4

unicode-math does many things \AtBeginDocument, you can delay your declarations: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{unicode-math} \setmathfont{Garamond-Math.otf} \DeclareSymbolFont{gs}{OML}{cmm}{m}{it} \newcommand*\RedeclareMathSymbol[4]{% \let#1\relax \DeclareMathSymbol{#1}{#2}{#3}{#4}% } \AtBeginDocument{% \RedeclareMathSymbol{\alpha}{\mathalpha}{...


4

It doesn't work because unicode-math sets the font tables at begin document. You should use the range feature instead: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{amsthm} \usepackage[math-style=ISO, bold-style=ISO]{unicode-math} \setmathfont{Garamond-Math.otf} \setmathfont{latinmodern-math.otf}[ Scale=MatchLowercase, range=it/{greek,Greek}...


5

You can rotate the \approx symbol and set it as a relation: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{graphicx} \makeatletter \newcommand{\@curveslash}[2]{\rotatebox[origin=c]{70}{$#1#2$}} \newcommand{\curveslash}{\mathrel{\mathpalette\@curveslash\approx}} \makeatother \begin{document} \ldots enveloping quotient $H \curveslash H$. \[ H \curveslash H_{H \...


7

The ≙ symbol is U+2259 in Unicode. It has the name \wedgeq in several newer packages, including unicode-math and stix. It is \hateq in two older ones, mnsymbol and fdsymbol. One completely obsolete one, boisik, has \corresponds. Edit: Sorry, just noticed that Barbara Beeton said that in a comment first. Props!


17

Before somebody suggests MnSymbol… \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \makeatletter \providecommand{\hateq}{\mathrel{\mathpalette\my@hat@eq\relax}} \newcommand{\my@hat@eq}[2]{% \begingroup \sbox\z@{$\m@th#1=$}% \ooalign{% \hidewidth\raisebox{-0.3\ht\z@}{$\m@th#1\widehat{}$}\hidewidth\cr \box\z@\cr }% \endgroup } \makeatother \...


6

Here's a chemformula solution: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{chemformula} \NewChemBond{quintuple}{ \foreach \i in {-.7ex,-.35ex,0ex,.35ex,.7ex}{ \draw[chembond] ([yshift=\i]chemformula-bond-start) -- ([yshift=\i]chemformula-bond-end) ; } } \NewChemCompoundProperty{|}{\bond{quintuple}} \begin{document} \setchemformula{bond-length=1em} ...


9

It seems like a variation of the congruence symbol. Denis's answer is aligned with the =. To align it with \cong you need more trickery: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} % necessary for correct scaling of \widehat \makeatletter \newcommand*{\varcong}{\mathrel{\mathpalette\@varcong\relax}} \newcommand*{\@varcong}[2]{\vcenter{\hbox{\m@th$#1\...


12

What you want could be obtained using \documentclass[12pt]{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \newcommand{\circumeq}{\mathrel{\widehat{=}}} \begin{document} \begin{equation*} a \circumeq b \end{equation*} \end{document}


2

I would definitely not use a symbol here and use the word times. If you really want the symbol then the second one or the fourth, but corrected to not lose the space so 107 \texttimes\ that you always need \after a command name in text But 107 times that is much better Note that you may or may not want to use $107$ to use numbers in text (with the ...


0

Here is a (humble) possibility using tikz. It won't resist scaling though \documentclass{standalone} \usepackage{tikz,amstext} \newlength{\tempheight} \newcommand{\Let}[0]{% \mathbin{\text{\settoheight{\tempheight}{\mathstrut}\raisebox{0.5\pgflinewidth}{% \tikz[baseline,line cap=round,line join=round] \draw (0,0) --++ (0.4em,0) --++ (0,1.5ex) --++ (-0.4em,0)...


0

It's not perfect, but I use \newcommand{\notimplies}{\;\not\!\!\!\implies} which looks like this:


6

\colon and : are defined in fontmath.ltx using: \DeclareMathSymbol{\colon}{\mathpunct}{operators}{"3A} \DeclareMathSymbol{:}{\mathrel}{operators}{"3A} which makes \colon a punctuation and : a relation symbol, as you said yourself. You can swap the definitions: \DeclareMathSymbol{:}{\mathpunct}{operators}{"3A} \DeclareMathSymbol{\colon}{\mathrel}{...


5

Thanks for all the great leads guys. I liked @unbonpetit's response with the long lines (admittedly longer than em-dash like I initially wanted), so I decided to modify the code a bit and got a really nice result: What's nice is you can play around with the positioning and I was able to get it slightly (vertically) off-center so that it lies closer to the ...


2

The second π looks like the ones you would find in fonts sold by Bitstream. Unless you have copies of these commercial fonts, there is no way to change \pi into your desired glyph (unless you want to draw one yourself). By the way, this letterform does not go well with Times at all. I would not recommend changing the already well-designed MathTime Pro....


5

Is this close to what you want? \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath, amssymb} \usepackage{graphicx} \usepackage{stackengine} \newcommand{\mybond}{\mathrel{\scalebox{1.5}[0.84]{$\stackMath\stackinset{c}{-1.4pt}{c}{4.3pt}{=}{\equiv}$}}} \begin{document} \[\mathrm{N}\mybond \text{---}\]% \end{document}


2

A simple solution is to declare another “math alphabet” with a different name: % My standard header for TeX.SX answers: \documentclass[a4paper]{article} % To avoid confusion, let us explicitly % declare the paper format. \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} % Not always necessary, but recommended. % End of standard header. ...


6

Another possible solution, with the \bigovoid symbol from mathabx and \stackinset from stackengine to insert a smaller \bigovoid inside a larger one: \documentclass[12pt]{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage{graphicx} \usepackage{stackengine} \DeclareFontFamily{U}{mathx}{\hyphenchar\font45} \DeclareFontShape{U}{mathx}{m}{n}{% <-6> mathx5 &...


13

A circle with variable line thickness: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath,pict2e} \makeatletter \newcommand{\bigcomp}{% \DOTSB \mathop{\vphantom{\sum}\mathpalette\bigcomp@\relax}% \slimits@ } \newcommand{\bigcomp@}[2]{% \begingroup\m@th \sbox\z@{$#1\sum$}% \setlength{\unitlength}{0.9\dimexpr\ht\z@+\dp\z@}% \vcenter{\hbox{% \begin{...


0

\documentclass{article} \newcommand\ustexttt[1]{\bgroup\ttfamily\ustextttaux#1\relax\relax} \def\ustextttaux#1#2\relax{\ifx_#1\_\else#1\fi \allowbreak \ifx\relax#2\relax\def\next{\egroup}\else\def\next{\ustextttaux#2\relax}\fi \next} \begin{document} Here is an example \ustexttt{multiple_words_long_with_underscores_representing_spaces} of converted ...


3

Consider using listings' \lstinline (experimental): \documentclass{article} \usepackage{listings} \lstset{ basicstyle = \ttfamily } \let\code\lstinline \begin{document} Some regular text. Some \code{code} inline. Then some \code{multiple_words} code word. \end{document}


2

The stix package gives you not only \parallelogram and \parallelogramblack, but also \fltns. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{stix} \begin{document} $\parallelogram \parallelogramblack \fltns$ \end{document}


2

\documentclass[11pt,a4paper]{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} \[F_n(x)\underrightarrow{L^2}F(x)\] % answer by Sango \[F_n(x)\overset{\scriptstyle L^2}{\to}F(x)\] % answer by Sebastiano \end{document}


3

Here is a possibility with stackengine and the \bigovoid symbol from mathabx (without replacing the default maths fonts with the mathabx fonts): \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \DeclareFontFamily{U}{mathx}{\hyphenchar\font45} \DeclareFontShape{U}{mathx}{m}{n}{% <-6> mathx5 <6-7> mathx6 <7-8> mathx7 <8-9> mathx8 <9-...


5

You can use a scaled up version of \bigcirc and \ooalign: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath,graphicx} \makeatletter \newcommand{\makecircled}[2][\mathord]{#1{\mathpalette\make@circled{#2}}} \newcommand{\make@circled}[2]{% \begingroup\m@th \vphantom{\biggercirc{#1}}% \ooalign{$#1\biggercirc{#1}$\cr\hidewidth$#1#2$\hidewidth\cr}% \endgroup }...


3

You can use TikZ to draw a circle node with a # inside. Using \DeclareMathOperator from amsmath improves the spacing. The character should be a bit smaller than the current font, which you can do using \smaller from the relsize package, to make sure it works in different fontsizes. MWE: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{tikz} \...


3

I have created your symbol with a combination of packages. Excuse me for the complicated code. The symbol has the name \disj. It is a variable name that you can change. Here is my MWE: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath,amssymb} \usepackage{MnSymbol,scalerel} \newcommand{\disj}{\mathrel{{\bigcircle}\mkern-4mu\raise.3ex\llap{$\scaleobj{.6}{\#}$}}} \...


4

For Computer Modern, use pict2e: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{pict2e} \usepackage{color} % for the comparison \makeatletter \newcommand{\cbar}{\mathbin{\mathpalette\c@bar\relax}} \newcommand{\c@bar}[2]{% \begingroup \sbox\z@{$#1\cup$}% \setlength{\unitlength}{\dimexpr\ht\z@+\dp\z@}% \mkern1mu \raisebox{-\dp\z@}{% \begin{picture}(0,1) ...


5

\stretchrel from the scalerel package allows you to do such things. \documentclass[border=1mm]{standalone} \usepackage{scalerel} \begin{document} \Huge $\cup \ \cap \ \stretchrel*{\mid}{\cap}$ \end{document}


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