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39

1. Built-in Short Cuts: When you pull down the menu items you see the keyboard shortcuts. Here is an example of the Source menu: 2. Command Completion: If you simply start typing the command you want hit esc you get: Hitting esc again: 3. Abbreviations: Besides command completion there are also abbreviations. All abbreviations for environments start ...


36

TeXShop is a much more mature application, with a large user base and active development. Some advantages: Macro editor that allows you to attach commands or menu items to arbitrary chunks of code Palettes of commonly used symbols and constructs Simple table input editor Macro to paste spreadsheet cells from Excel/Numbers etc. as LaTeX tabulars BibDesk ...


34

TeXshop, like TeXworks, allows you to define some stuff by special comments at the beginning of a file. To define a master file, add % !TEX root = path/to/root.tex to the beginning of your file. This will cause root.tex to be compiled instead of the current file.


28

Amazingly enough, TeXShop does in fact have such a facility. The problem is that long-time users of it like myself are probably unaware of it. It can be found under the Edit Menu -> Experiment This menu will open a window which you can copy a snippet of the currently open document. When you press the Typeset button on the window, it will show the result ...


24

I solved this is a mildly hacky way. First of all, I wrote a script called TeXShopBib.sh which looks like #!/bin/sh filestem=${1%.*} bibtype=`head -n20 "${filestem}.tex" | sed -n 's/\%[ ]*![ ]*BIB[ ]*TS-program[ ]*=[ ]*\([a-z]*\)/\1/p'` if [ -z $bibtype ]; then echo "No option detected in TeX file. Defaulting to BibTeX." bibtype="bibtex" else ...


22

With Emacs and AUCTeX, it is as simple as highlighting the portion of the text you want to compile and then hitting C-c C-r (or M-x TeX-command-region). The command tries to be 'smart' about it, so if you do C-c C-r RET C-c C-r RET (i.e., run the same command on the same section twice) it will first compile, then, second, open a viewer for resultant PDF. (...


19

Beginning with version 3.21, this feature is provided (by this very request!). From the release notes: The next feature was requested by Alan Munn about a year ago. Apologies for the delay. In the meantime, Mark Everitt wrote an ingenious script to provide this feature. The feature provided by that script is now built into TeXShop. The command ...


18

In the Prefs of TeXShop, you choose the font of the source (what you see on the screen) : And then \usepackage{fourier} or \usepackage{lmodern} or some other package in your preamble to set the font for your pdf.


17

Based on this LaTeX website, there are following solutions for your problem. According the subsection "indirekte Eingabe von Umlauten" you can write \"A, \"O, \"U, \"a, \"o, \"u and \ss{} or {\"A}, {\"O}, {\"U}, {\"a}, {\"o}, {\"u} and {\ss} to get german letters. If you include the german or ngmerman (ngerman has the new hyphentation rules), you can write ...


17

If you have an entry whose author field currently reads author = "Plinio el viejo", BibTeX and biblatex (biber) will interpret "el" as the "von" component of the person's full name, and therefore also "viejo" as the surname component and "Plinio" as the first-name component of the full name. Obviously, that's not what you want for this entry. To indicate ...


16

In addition to Ian Thompson's comment, if you are using TeXShop then you don't even have to bother with the command line, as TeXShop provides you with a graphical interface. Just switch to BibTeX in the pop-up menu after a first LaTeX compilation, then press typeset (this is equivalent to calling bibtex paperin the command line) exactly as for a LaTeX ...


16

I had not heard of that color scheme before so I followed the links and coded up the solarized TeXShop Color Scheme script as an AppleScript. If you put this in ~/Library/Applications/Scripts/TeXShop/ it will appear as an item in the Scripts menu on the right-hand side of the menu bar. Although, for the preferences to take effect, TeXShop needs to be ...


15

You'll have a TeXShop Engines directory containing the shell scripts that are invoked whenever you hit the Typeset button. The script that's called depends which engine you have selected. For XeLaTeX it's usually ~/Library/TeXShop/Engines/XeLaTeX.engine by default. It looks something like this: #!/bin/tcsh set path= ($path /Library/TeX/texbin /usr/texbin /...


15

LuaLaTeX is your choice! Greek is possible without any adjustments. Hebrew, as it is a language from right to left, needs adjustments. Of course, you need to use \usepackage{fontspec} in the preamble (as is usual when using LuaLatex). Greek You need a font that supports all the accents. If your mainfont for latin text does not support them, you need to ...


15

According to About TeXShop (available here) "Auto completion is user configurable. To configure, open the file ˜/Library/TeXShop/Keyboard/autocompletion.plist with TeXShop. Read the comments at the top, edit appropriately to redefine Landweber’s choices or add your own, and save. Be sure to edit and save in UTF-8 format if you use Unicode ...


15

TeXShop doesn't do the BibTeX run by itself. First step: run LaTeX Here's how the window should appear Second step: choose BibTeX Choose BibTeX from the dropdown menu Third step: run BibTeX Click on the "Typeset" button (or hit Command-T) Then return to LaTeX and compile again. You can run BibTeX when you need it, you don't need it to be run at each ...


14

I raised this issue on the TeX on OS X mailing list a few years ago, and received the following reply from Herb Schulz, who created the basic autocompletion file for TeXShop: Well, they will show up depending upon your input encoding. You are supposed to replace them by using the Next/Previous Mark commands to move and select them and replace them. When I ...


14

I just solved it. You just need to change the path of the files for the command according to the new organization in El Captain. I posted a screenshot. It works for me! Hope this helps!


13

Assuming you're on Mac OS X (otherwise there would be no TeXShop available to you), all you need is to click on a .tex file in a Finder window and choose "Get Info" from the "File" menu. In the window that pops up go at the tab named "Open with" and from the popup menu choose "TeXShop.app" Then click on the button just below, named "Change All…" Warning: ...


13

I quote from the Release Notes of version 3.18 Version 3.18 has only a single change: TeXShop contains an obsolete sync method called Search Sync, and a modern replacement by Jerome Laurens called SyncTeX. In recent versions of TeXShop, the obsolete Search Sync from the Preview Window to the Source Window randomly hangs, making TeXShop unresponsive ...


13

This is a working but basic answer; it's somewhat involved. Also, I am not a programmer by any definition, nor an Os X expert. Surely there are better ways to achieve the same effect. At the end of the answer, there's a link where you can download a copy of the app described in the post. Background In Os X, any directory with an extension can be a "...


12

Many editors, including TexShop, provide the concept of modelines, "magic comments" in which one can specify various editor settings. This provides a per-document configuration of the editor. The following snippets sets the encoding to utf-8 for TexShop, Emacs and Vim: % !TEX encoding = UTF-8 Unicode % -*- coding: UTF-8; -*- % vim: set fenc=utf-8 It is ...


12

This is a bug that was introduced in 2.45. Version 2.46 has now been released to fix it: From the update window in TeXShop: TeXShop 2.45 introduced a bug; users had to save the source file before typesetting. TeXShop 2.46 fixes that inadvertent bug and returns to the standard TeXShop behavior. So the solution is to check for updates in TeXShop ...


12

Here is what I did to get gnuplot working on a Mac. (You need to use the Terminal for this.) Goto GNU Plot on Sourceforge and download the source code. This should unzip in a folder gnuplot-4.6.0 in your Downloads folder. Open a Terminal window and issue the following commands: (hit the return key after each; the last three commands will produce quite a ...


12

You can't. LaTeX has to build the .aux file to store the table of content (ToC) and such, because when typesetting the ToC it can't know beforehand what sections will occur. LaTeX works sequentially. First run: collect all sections and such and store it in .aux file. Second run: Use .aux file to typeset the ToC. Actually it does both things at once: typset ...


12

Another way to enter the characters is to enter them directly with the \XeTeXglyph macro or use their Unicode character code using the \char macro. For example, the heart symbol is Unicode 2665 so you can enter that using: \char"2665 It's also possible to use the font specific glyph index number. For a font like the C64 font, which doesn't have a huge ...


12

The default language is the one chosen in the “Language & Text” System Preferences pane, where you can set the region to “British”. Or you can choose the language in the TeXShop Edit menu (“Show Spelling and Grammar”, that in the picture becomes “Hide”)


12

Kile has this feature. It is called QuickPreview. I've never used it before, but I tested it in a minimal example and it seems to work. I tested with my answer to another question: \documentclass[tikz,border=10pt]{standalone} \usepackage{circuitikz} \standaloneenv{circuitikz} \usetikzlibrary{fit} \begin{document} \tikzset{ pics/multimeter/.style={ ...


11

Save a new file ~/Library/TeXShop/Engines/Nomenclature.engine with following contents: #!/bin/sh bfname=$(dirname "$1")/"`basename "$1" .tex`" makeindex "$bfname".nlo -s nomencl.ist -o "$bfname".nls Make this new file executable using chmod u+x ~/Library/TeXShop/Engines/Nomenclature.engine from within a shell or set the executable bit at the file ...


11

It's not enough to choose utf8 when you save your file (save as, I suppose) because when you open a new file, it's the encoding of the Prefs that it's used. You need to choose utf-8 in the prefs of TexShop "Document" . Now you need to know the encoding of your initial file. Then you need to know the state of the actual document. There are some useful tools ...


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