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\umathbb{R} for u​pside down \rmathbb{R} for r​eflected \fmathbb{R} for f​lipped \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{graphicx} \makeatletter \newcommand{\umathbb}[1]{{\mathpalette\dude@umathbb{#1}}} \newcommand{\dude@umathbb}[2]{% \raisebox{\depth}{\rotatebox{180}{$\m@th#1\mathbb{#2}$}}% } \newcommand{\rmathbb}[1]{{\mathpalette\...


6

A general version that works across math styles. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath,scalerel} \newcommand\doverline[1]{\ThisStyle{% \setbox0=\hbox{$\SavedStyle\overline{#1}$}% \ht0=\dimexpr\ht0-.15ex\relax% CHANGE .15 TO AFFECT SPACING \overline{\copy0}% }} \begin{document} $\overline{X} + \doverline{X}$ $\scriptstyle\overline{X} + \...


4

You can easily define your own undergraphic with a sine wave in MetaFun. \setupwhitespace[big] \startuseMPgraphic{rules:under:wave} draw function(2, "x", "sin(2*(x mod (2*pi)))", 0, RuleWidth, 1pt) shifted (0,RuleFactor*RuleOffset+RuleDepth) withpen pencircle scaled RuleThickness withcolor RuleColor ; setbounds ...


4

Supports smaller math styles. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsfonts,scalerel,graphicx} \newcommand\umathbb[1]{% \ThisStyle{\rotatebox[origin=c]{180}{$\SavedStyle\mathbb{#1}$}}} \newcommand\rmathbb[1]{% \ThisStyle{\scalebox{-1}[1]{$\SavedStyle\mathbb{#1}$}}} \newcommand\fmathbb[1]{% \ThisStyle{\scalebox{-1}[1]{\rotatebox[origin=c]{180}{$\...


3

This shows the manual way. It also provides a macro, that eases the input of this, spaces would be ignored in the input of that word. \documentclass[]{article} \makeatletter \newcommand*\verticalword[2][c] {% \begin{tabular}[#1]{@{}c@{}} \verticalword@#2\verticalword@ \end{tabular} } \newcommand*\verticalword@[1] {% \ifx\...


2

Two other solutions: one with the \widebar command, borrowed from mathabx, another based on \overbracket, from mathtools: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage{mathtools} \newcommand{\wideBar}[1]{\overbracket[0.3pt][0pt]{\overbracket[0.3pt][0pt]{\mkern-2.8mu #1}}} \DeclareFontFamily{U}{mathx}{\hyphenchar\...


2

Here is a version that uses ntheorem to create such theorem environments. Its spacing is identical to that of the amsthm theorem environments. Theorems are actually list environments with just a single item whose label is the theorem's head. What makes drop-capped theorem heads a little difficult to implement is the fact that \lettrine doesn't just produce ...


2

I have come up with this monstrosity: \newtheoremstyle{dropcap}% name of the style to be used {\parsep}% measure of space to leave above the theorem. {\topsep}% measure of space to leave below the theorem. {}% default font to use in the body of the theorem {0pt}% NO indenture of theorem head {\bfseries}% name of head font --- DOESN'T MATTER {}% ...


1

The problem is that your path starts from the bottom left corner, so when you say text align=center you try to center near to the top right corner. But this is not what you want. You want to decorate and center your text only along the bottom (or the top) arc. So it would be nice if we could make a partial decorate \path ...decorate{...} ...; in an post-...


1

[Extending the answer given by Dorian] To achieve multiple strikethroughs in a single table, rather than declaring more and more commands, you can specify the start/end points dynamically: \usepackage{tikz} \tikzstyle{every picture}+=[remember picture] \tikzstyle{na} = [shape=rectangle,inner sep=0pt] % end point for strike \newcommand{\ptStrike}[2]{ ...


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