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Put \onecolumn when you want one column and \twocolumn when you want two columns % onetwocolprob2.tex SE 555696 \documentclass[10pt]{book} \usepackage{lipsum} %%% added \usepackage[paperheight=9in,paperwidth=7in, top=1in, bottom=0.8in, twocolumn, twoside]{geometry} \setlength{\columnseprule}{0.4pt} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage[...


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In the following example, I have used width=\columnwidth to make sure the graph is as wide as one column in a twocolumn document. Additionally, I have use siunitx in order to avoid repetitive code in the table: \documentclass[twocolumn]{article} \usepackage{tabularx} \usepackage{tikz, pgfplots} \usepackage{showframe} \usepackage{lipsum} \usepackage{siunitx} ...


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Here is my slightly different suggestion, also based on tabularx. Additionally to using tabularx and an X type column for the first column in order to ensure the table fits into the available text width, I have used wc{...} type columns for the month columns. This makes them equally wide. I have also moved the color definitions to the preamble and made sure ...


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Some comments and suggestions: Use a tabularx environment instead of a tabular environment, and use (a modified form of) the X column type for the first column. Get rid of all ~ ("tie") spacers; that way, the 11 data columns take up a lot less space, meaning that there's more space available for the first column. No useful purpose appears to be ...


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You can control the spacing between columns in a \pseudocode or \procedure command via the colspace option. Setting it to a negative space collapses the columns which, in particular for protocols, allows for more compact presentation. The following example is with colspace=-1cm. \documentclass[10pt,journal,compsoc]{IEEEtran} \usepackage{float} \usepackage{...


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