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4

I am only interested in the most standard subset of mathematical symbols that are already present in plain TeX. Presumably, at least these standard symbols are supported by LaTeX, which would result in a solution that is more efficient than defining every single Unicode character used in the document via the commands \DeclareUnicodeCharacter LaTeX supports ...


3

As Don wrote you need at first a font with greek chars. But beside this the url must also be percent encoded in the PDF to work correctly. This means you should use \href: \href{http://www.dezemeros.com/index.php/2018-12-20-10-21-59/14463-%CE%B4%CE%B7%CE%BC%CE%BF%CF%84%CE%B9%CE%BA%CE%BF-%CE%BA%CE%B5%CE%BD%CF%84%CF%81%CE%BF-%CE%B5%CE%B9%CE%BA%CE%B1%CF%83%CF%...


2

The problem is that there's not really a fallback mechanism for the Unicode characters to be output in another font if the current font lacks them. lmtt, which is the default typewriter font in XeLaTeX, does not have the Greek characters. There is, however, CMU Typewriter Text which does have them. Adding the line \setmonofont{CMU Typewriter Text}¹ to your ...


2

The notes class shown in the comments breaks almost every LaTeX accent command. In particlular here it redefines \v to be \boldsymbol{v} which is not a v accent and is a math mode command so generating the error you show. A simpler example is \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \renewcommand{\v}{{\boldsymbol v}} \begin{document} Hello ř \end{...


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