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I found this Overleaf Project helpful for rendering both colored and monochrome emojis in OverLeaf. The same trick can be applied to Emoji Skin Tone Modifiers in Overleaf where the modifier comes right after the emoji Unicode. \documentclass[12pt]{article} \usepackage{parskip} \usepackage{fontspec} \newfontfamily{\NotoEmoji} {NotoColorEmoji.ttf}[Renderer=...


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As others have already said, the issue is the accented characters, likely in the .bib file. Replace the culprit characters there with the corresponding latex-appropriate e.g. \'{i}.


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In LuaLaTeX The babel package in LuaLaTeX lets you auto-detect what script you’re typing in, and switch the font and hyphenation patterns you use accordingly. The default font does not support Greek, so you need to pick one that does. \documentclass[italian]{article} \tracinglostchars=2 \usepackage{babel} \usepackage[default]{fontsetup} % Load New Computer ...


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Install and then select a Hebrew font that has italics, such as David CLM from Culmus. Decide whether you want them slanted right or left.


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As far as I know there is no font for pdflatex that has U+20B4 HRYVNIA SIGN ₴ (the symbol for the Ukrainian currency). You can emulate it, with something like \documentclass[a4paper]{article} \usepackage[ukrainian]{babel} \usepackage{graphicx} \DeclareRobustCommand{\hryvnia}{{% \fontencoding{OT1}\upshape \settoheight{\dimen255}{S}% \vphantom{S}% \...


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I presume you are using pdfTeX, otherwise you wouldn't have issues with Unicode. There are a few options, depending on what precisely you want to do. If you don't want the argument to expand at all, then you can use \exp_not:n {#1} to prevent \write from messing up the active UTF-8 tokens: \NewDocumentCommand { \writetofile } { m } { \iow_now:Nx \...


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Use the option unicode for hyperref (but it will be the default in the next hyperref version). I would also prefer babel over the polski package, I'm not quite trusting its catcode settings. And load hyperref always rather late. inputenc is not needed anymore in a current latex. \documentclass[a4paper,12pt]{article} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage[...


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With this kind of Unicode input it is (much) easier to use one of the two Unicode engines, i.e., XeLaTeX or LuaLaTeX (and not pdfLaTeX), and select a font that contains these characters. Example with XeLaTeX and DejaVu Serif as font: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \setmainfont{DejaVu Serif} \usepackage{gb4e} \begin{document} \begin{exe} \...


11

A short writeup of the comments if you use pdflatex T1 with fontenc is still relevant for better use of the fonts. as for utf8 it is now the default has has been for some time, so you ought to be able to drop it. Personally I tend to add it anyways just as a reminder (some editors actually scans the preamble) but also if the document later on might be sent ...


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You can define yourself the names (I guess that TU should add these). \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \setmainfont{NewComputerModern} \newfontfamily{\ebgar}{EB Garamond} \newlength{\len} % this is not even in xunicode \DeclareTextSymbol{\textnbhyphen}{\UnicodeEncodingName}{"2011} % this is in xunicode \DeclareTextSymbol{\...


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Using U+2013 as an example as they are all the same. – Just type the character directly. ^^^^2013 The ^^ notation (as in classic tex but extended to 4 or 6 ^) produces the character (as an input character) at the very earliest stage. So unlike following options can be used anywhere the character can be used eg \^^^^2013 is \– \char"2013 (or latex \...


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If you're using OverLeaf, you could follow the example at https://www.overleaf.com/latex/examples/how-to-write-multilingual-text-with-different-scripts-in-latex/wfdxqhcyyjxz \usepackage{fontspec} \usepackage{xunicode} %% loading this first to avoid clash with bidi/arabic %%% For language switching -- like babel, but for xelatex \usepackage{polyglossia} \...


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Javier Bezos solved your problem, but for a bit more of an explanation. The babel package is great, but you just ran into one of its biggest problems. You loaded \usepackage[english,thai]{babel} When you passed the thai option, babel loaded a file called thai.ldf. It tries to load an 8-bit font and does not work with Unicode. The dead giveaway is that ...


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In case anyone is wondering how you actually find the character (it is invisible after all), you can paste what you understand to be the problematic portion of your code here and use the regex expression /[^\x00-\x7F] to highlight non-ascii characters (try it with the OP's bibtex snippet). Better yet, since we are given a warning about which character isn't ...


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You might use METAFONT fonts: \catcode`ü=\active \protected\def ü{\"u} grün gr\"un \fontname\font \bye You might study sections from 6.3 to 6.5 of the LuaTeX manual to see whether an approach with virtual fonts is feasible. However, this would require extensive work for defining virtual fonts from existing ones. Using European Modern fonts (that ...


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Thanks to the tip from latexerexetal, I have a functioning workaround. It would be vastly preferable to enter normal LaTeX in a way that the blahtex engine could digest — after all, the blahtex documentation claims it supports Unicode character input. For completeness, I repeat the process in full here. First, you have to enable the Unicode Hex Input ...


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From your comments, it sounds as if you want to use Mongolian with a document class that sets the font to Times. (The more information you give us about what you are trying to do, the easier it is to help.) Since the default Times font does not support Cyrillic, you must select a supplementary font that does, such as Tempora. Here is a template in ...


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There is no way to do it using commands like \mars because those commands aren't in the subset of commands supported by blahtex. You can, however, enter the symbols using their unicode character codes. Here's how I do it under macOS Catalina. Go to System Preferences -> Keyboard and select "Show keyboard and emoji viewers in menu bar." Then ...


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In node mode, restoring the full text is not generally possible because you get shaped output and shaped glyphs can not be uniquely mapped back to input text. You can only approximate it by using tounicode values. These map to the actual PDF file ToUnicode CMap entries and therefore follow their restricted model of glyph to Unicode mapping: Every glyph is ...


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Welcome to TeX.SX! The LuaTeX shaper dev2 has been a bit troublesome with Indic scripts, but there's been another version called deva out, as mentioned in https://tex.stackexchange.com/a/362738/90407. However, recently, LuaTeX has additionally support to use the HarfBuzz shaper instead of the built-in one. Both variants should give comparable results, ...


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There are two issues at play here: The primary problem is that the selected font does not contain the characters in question, the other issue is that using fontspec fontloading commands without explicitly specifying a script and language default to Latin script and therefore does not shape indic scripts correctly. If you do not want to worry about the right ...


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If you love the traditional typefaces provided by the tipa package, but are unable to use the Unicode data with it, don't worry! There is a new package on CTAN named unitipa which converts not only the independent consonant and vowel characters, but also the dependent vowel diacritics with the help of LuaLaTeX. See the following example. %!TeX Program = ...


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As @Davislor says in their answer, You can use Unicode input with tipa (other than combining accents in PDFTeX) by setting the Unicode character active with \DeclareUnicodeCharacter or newunicodechar. There is a new package on CTAN named unitipa which converts not only the independent consonant and vowel characters, but also the dependent vowel diacritics ...


3

I don't know too much about how HarfBuzz fonts are handled by Luaotfload, but I was able to find the way how to get the tounicode fields, thanks to table.serialize. So my original code adapted for Harfbuzz looks like this: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[lmargin=0.5in,tmargin=0.5in,rmargin=0.5in,bmargin=0.5in]{geometry} \usepackage{fontspec} \usepackage{...


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