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The message There were undefined references is one of the last things printed on screen to catch your attention to the issue. However, scrolling up to the console output or the log file will show the line number where the undefined reference was found. The file \documentclass{article} \begin{document} \section{foo}\label{foo} This is section \ref{fo} \end{...


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biblatex currently does not mention the line number for entries that could not be found if they are marked as missing by Biber. If you want to get the line number even in this cases, apply the following redefinition to \blx@citation@entry \documentclass[british]{article} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage{babel} \usepackage{csquotes} \usepackage[backend=...


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The bcf-file is rather long, but it is also well structured, and you are only interested in the cite keys. So if you search for bcf:citekey you get quite fast to the list of citekeys starting with <bcf:citekey order="1">goepel:2020</bcf:citekey> <bcf:citekey order="2">boyd:un:2019</bcf:citekey> There you only ...


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I also had the idea of using binary search, only the other way around to Marijn's suggestion. I put a non-existing marker citation in the middle of the document and moved that in decreasing log2 steps forward or backward depending on how the order of the biber warnings changed. That way I was able to pin down two paragraphs with the errors: \parencite[vgl.][]...


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The tufte classes also use geometry to specify the layout, and these parameters are used if you did not override them. And that includes both the textheight and paperheight parameters. Now all the vertical sizes that you gave, and textheight should add up to paperheight, but it doesn't. So geomerty has to decide whether to throw away textheightorpaperheight. ...


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