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Alan's answer works OK, but with the current version of Forest there is no need to define the edge path from scratch. Instead, we can use the edges library with the option forked edges. Moreover, we can eliminate growth parent anchor=east as it doesn't do anything (even in the old version of Forest), and we can use the parent and children anchors rather than ...


44

New version of writer2latex is pretty good. It works with the Open Office, but I think their command line utility should work without the OO. You can set quality of the converted document - from LaTeX as clean as possible, to version which tries to emulate appearance of source word document. Structure and basic formatting should be converted well, but I am ...


40

This is not very difficult to do with forest. The following example should get you started. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{forest} \begin{document} \begin{forest}for tree={ grow=east parent anchor=east, child anchor=west, math content, edge path={\noexpand\path[\forestoption{edge},->, >={latex}] (!u.parent anchor) --...


31

As a working scientist, I can answer: no, please do not focus on tricky solutions. First of all, you are going to write a paper, and I guess you will send it to a journal for possible publication. So you should not start a religion war to use a piece of software that will be totally irrelevant for the final purpose. Unless, of course, the journal needs a ...


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This answer is specific to OS X... Command line utility textutil There's a nice command line utility called textutil included in OS X that will convert among common document formats: Word docx to txt $ textutil -convert txt worddoc.docx txt to Word docx $ textutil -convert docx mytextdoc.txt txt to Word, using Times New Roman 12pt $ textutil -convert ...


23

Antiword is going to do reasonable good job converting .doc to .tex files . It makes every effort to preserve not only the content but formating as well. It is well suited for batch processing that you want to do. Edit: Several people asked me privately about LaTeX switch in Antiword and the latest version of Antiword. The latest version is indeed 0.37. As ...


21

The free open source word processor AbiWord has an MS Word import function, and, if you install it (be sure to check it under install time, or if on Linux, install the necessary plugin package), a LaTeX export function. It works decently well for simple documents. I personally prefer it to the other options, including writer2latex. Another tool I've tried ...


17

You can't convert MS Word document to LaTeX directly. The two formats are rather incompatible. Last time I had to do it (a 4-page paper written by my Prof) I saved it as text-only and readded all formatting, math, images and tables manually. As you can guess it was quite an effort which is not doable for a 350 pages document, except in the unlikely case that ...


16

If your supervisor does absolutely insist on Word as Editor there is little you can do. However, if it is more the "Word-like user experience" (as opposed to "LaTeX source code user experience"), LyX might be a considerable compromise for the both of you! LyX is a "WYSIWYW" (What You See is What You Want) text processing system that uses LaTeX as back-end. ...


16

Headings (Heading 1, Heading 2, Heading 3) \section{title} \subsection{title} … \paragraph{title} \subparagraph{title} You can define others as necessary/appropriate, but I'd caution you against making the document structure too deep. Lists (bullets, numbered lists, multilevel lists. with all the various list types displayed in the dropdowns of ...


15

I am somewhat late to the party, as the question's author has, hopefully, graduated. But, for the sake of completeness of answers, I'd like to mention a universal (and now very popular) format converter pandoc (http://johnmacfarlane.net/pandoc), which is open source and supports an extremely wide variety of document formats, including presentation slides and ...


13

I do this in my reports. First you need the setup in your class or style file. In my case, it is our report class and it contains the following definitions for doing a govt SF-298 form: \newenvironment{createSFtwoNINEeight}{ \clearpage \begin{singlespace} \begin{picture}(612,650)(70,82) \includegraphics{SF298} \footnotesize \@...


13

Consider that this is not the right approach at all, but I am not an expert and this is the only way I know. \documentclass[border=0.5cm]{standalone} \usepackage{tikz} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture} % \draw [help lines] (0,0) grid (13,13); \draw [thick] (0,0) -- (0,10); \draw [thick,-latex] (0,5) -- + (0.5,0) node [right] {$A<T<A_{f}...


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I offer two options for you (Option 2 is best if you aren't going to compile anymore): Option 1 Download OpenOffice for free and download writer2latex, also free. It supports xelatex export too! It also does a nice job exporting tables. Option 2 A project I worked on to make Word documents resemble LaTeX documents. You will need a Mac for this. https://...


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MathType can make a conversion to LaTeX(and many other formats) right out of the box. It adds its own ribbon menu in Word 2010. You can find conversion menu there.


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This isn't technically an answer to the question you asked, but it looks from your question that you may have a misunderstanding. Latex is a type setting language, and through programs such as pdflatex, you can turn this into a pdf file. It is certainly not the only way to create a pdf file. If creating a pdf from your word file is your ultimate goal, then ...


11

A lot depends on how complicated the Word document formatting is. I have had very good success with rtf2latex2e, which converts RTF formatted text to LaTeX. It has various levels of matching the RTF formatting. I have mainly used its "minimal LaTeX markup mode", which is ideal for a document that will be subsequently hand-edited (which I understand is not ...


11

Just some tips, Use minipages and use a key-value interface for entering the data. Entering data when you have 10 minutes to get a form out for a late report that gets lost in an avalanche of LaTeX commands is confusing and error prone. Think of minipages as divs if you familiar with html is the same concept. Get to know thy minipages. You will have to ...


11

The main Question is, Are you using any of the advanced features of LaTeX? If you are, Let them work in whatever editor they like. But tell your co-authors you expect plain TXT (text) files. That way the editor does not matter and its only a matter of merging in there text into the LaTeX source files. If you are not. There is no real advantage of using ...


10

If you're running an AppleScript-compatible operating system, I've written a script to do this. It has many limitations as far as pictures go (totally unsupported), but it handles the essentials (bold, italics, underscores, percent signs, dollar signs, tables (in tabu)). Note that it keeps everything in unicode, therefore the fontspec package is recommended ...


10

Not exactly a 'Word2Latex' answer, but this will still achieve the end result requested: You can bridge the gap between Word and LaTeX by using LibreOffice's LaTeX export plugin. Open a Word document in LibreOffice, optionally save as ODT, and export to LaTeX. There will still be manual editing to do, but at least the major parts will be done for you - doc ...


10

From Word to LaTeX via Writer2LaTeX I will not repeat the manual of Writer2LaTeX, which you should read. But after some years I've got some practical experience: It is usefull to delete as much of the layout in Word as possible. The whole text should be in one language, make sure that Open/LibreOffice gets that as well. Otherwise you'll end with hundreds ...


8

I have tried most of the suggestions mentioned here at some point. The best workflow I have developed for this starts from first converting the MS Word document to an ODT file using Libre Office on the command line: loffice --headless --convert-to odt msword.doc && cp msword.odt loffice.odt After that, Writer2LaTeX does a pretty good job of ...


8

... just text with some light formatting, lots of dialogue etc. Many times, trying to save some time, we end up spending more. Personally, I had to convert lots of documents and the quickest in the end, was "cut-paste-edit." Even with documents as long as 300 pages it does not take more than a few hours. On the way, you correcting the manual and you ...


7

This will be a follow-on to Aleksandr Blekh’s extremely helpful recommendation of pandoc (http://johnmacfarlane.net/pandoc) above, collecting the comments I’ve been adding on the tweaking necessary after running it, which seem to be outgrowing the limitations of a comment. Wrap your title in \title{}, and add \maketitle. Likewise \author{}, \date{}, \...


7

I tried different commercial and free converters. All have there advantages and disadvantages but in the end I settled for the very nice docx2tex. There were some troubles when the docx-file contains a mix of different fonts but other than that the output is reasonably good. With a bit of manual work I converted a 70 page thesis but have not tried the ...


7

The only tool that I am aware of is the text2bib web based converter hosted at the University of Toronto. It will do a good first pass although the file will need some hand editing after conversion.


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In my experience Pandoc does a decent job of converting from MS Word 2016 files (.docx) to LaTeX. After installation on OSX El Capitan, I ran the following command to convert my MS Word file: pandoc -f docx -t latex -o out.tex in.docx Granted you'll still have to make some edits to match the original, but it is way better than starting afresh and it's free....


6

This is probably a bit too late, but 350 pages of conversion is a lot. You could try the following tools people have suggested above such as WordtoLatex, writer2latex or rtf2latex2e, but I doubt you will be able to go through all 350 pages without any hassle. Especially with tables, images and all. It might though take you a month to do this carefully! If ...


6

You should look into using XeTeX. With XeTeX, you can integrate all of your system fonts right into your document. You would be able to use this font with the MWE below. %!TEX TS-program = xelatex %!TEX encoding = UTF-8 Unicode \documentclass{article} \usepackage{xltxtra} % loads: fixltx2e, metalogo, xunicode, fontspec \defaultfontfeatures{Mapping=tex-...


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