Hot answers tagged

5

I think it's the pxtx fraktur font. \documentclass{article} \usepackage[frak=pxtx]{mathalpha} \begin{document} \(\mathfrak{R}\) \end{document}


5

Here's a LuaLaTeX-based solution. It provides a Lua function that does the actual work and a LaTeX utility macro, called \ColorRangeChar, which passes its three arguments to the Lua function. The three arguments are (a) and (b) integers that indicate the positions of the first and last characters to be colored and (c) the word itself. This solution ...


4

\documentclass{article} \usepackage{xcolor} \newcounter{pft} \begin{document} \makeatletter \def\pft#1-#2;{\edef\lower@pft{\the\numexpr#1-1}\edef\upper@pft{\the\numexpr#2+1}}% \def\ColorRgChar#1#2{\pft#1;% \setcounter{pft}{0}% \@tfor\next:=#2\do{\stepcounter{pft}% \ifnum\value{pft}>\lower@pft \ifnum\value{pft}<\upper@pft \textcolor{red}{\next}% \...


3

What about the below? \documentclass{book} \usepackage{amssymb} \begin{document} $\Re$ \end{document}


3

It is not clear what you like to get. I suspect that one from the following examples: generated by: \documentclass[margin=1mm,% added that border is better visible % in real document you can delete margin tikz,convert=pdf2svg]{standalone} %\documentclass[tikz, margin=1mm]{standalone} \usetikzlibrary{fit, ...


3

The bulk of the code is managing the input. The second argument can be a single number, meaning just one character to color; -, meaning color everything; m-, meaning color from the m-th character to the end; -n, meaning color from the start up to the n-th character; m-n, meaning color from the m-th up to the n-th character. \documentclass{article} \...


3

Here is an extension of egreg's first code in this answer to support ranges of the form min-max, where min means “start” if not given, and max means “end” if not provided. My code uses l3regex to parse the range expression. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{xcolor} \usepackage{xparse} \ExplSyntaxOn \msg_new:nnn { salim } { invalid-range-expression } { ...


2

Is this close enough? \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsfonts} \begin{document} $\mathfrak{R}$ \end{document}


2

For inline Hebrew, you should use \texthebrew. The hebrew environment is for paragraph text. %!TEX program = xelatex \documentclass{book} \usepackage{polyglossia} \usepackage{bidi} \setmainlanguage{english} \setotherlanguage{hebrew} \setmainfont{Latin Modern Roman} \newfontfamily\hebrewfont[Script=Hebrew]{Noto Sans Hebrew} \begin{document} Lorem ipsum dolor ...


1

Answer that emerged from the chat: not a real superscript but simple. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{lipsum} \usepackage[normalem]{ulem} \newcommand{\textss}[1]{\,\scriptsize\uline{#1}} \begin{document} \lipsum[1-5] more text and more text and\textss{more text and more text and more text and more text and more text and more text and more text and more ...


1

Use bidi's \RLE to correct the text direction: %!TEX program = xelatex \documentclass{book} \usepackage{polyglossia} \usepackage{bidi} \setmainlanguage{english} \setotherlanguage{hebrew} \setmainfont{Latin Modern Roman} \newfontfamily\hebrewfont[Script=Hebrew]{Noto Sans Hebrew} \begin{document} Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, \begin{hebrew}\RLE{לורם איפסום ...


1

This problem has been reported to and fixed by latex3 [1]. The fix is contained in l3kernel 2020-02-21 [2]. [1] https://github.com/latex3/latex3/issues/677 [2] https://github.com/latex3/latex3/blob/2020-02-21/l3kernel/CHANGELOG.md#2020-02-21


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible